How Did Karl Heinrich Marx's View Of Class Struggle In Society

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Karl Heinrich Marx was a philosopher, historian, revolutionary, and social scientist. His socialist thinking emerged from the 19th century. Marx’s ideas gained popularity after his death in the socialist movement. Also, his ideas have been modified for future generations and has brought change to political circumstances. Karl Heinrich Marx born in Trier, Prussia on May 5, 1818. He came from a long line of rabbis from both sides of the family. In 1818, Heinrich Marx, Karl Marx’s father, converted to the Lutheran Church. Heinrich was a Protestant; he agreed to baptism so that he would not lose his prestige as the best lawyer in Trier due to government harassment. Marx graduated high school at seventeen and enrolled into …show more content…
Friedrich Engels hand played a symbolic role in the League. It had pro-proletarian views and the slogan was “Working Men of All Countries, Unite!” At the end of 1847, Marx and Engels made a declaration of their views and beliefs, which led to the publishing of the Communist Manifesto. The Communist Manifesto explains the class struggles in society. It delves deep about the relationship between class struggle and the means of production. The “march of history” represents exploitation which leads to revolution. Marx’s views of class conflict consisted of six elements: structural change, political organization and power, two antagonistic classes, virtue of interests, shared life situations, and property ownership. Lastly, the Manifesto argues that capitalism is unstable and revolution must occur in order to eliminate class conflict. Marx moved back to Paris at the end of 1848. The New Rhenish newspaper was founded for the purpose of attacking the Prussian autocracy. Since the Communist League disbanded, Marx devoted his time to being an editor of this newspaper, which was discontinued shortly after being …show more content…
He won the election to the General Council. Mikhail Bakunin, leader of the anarchist wing, resisted Marx in his preparations for the Congresses of the International. A major event was the Paris Commune of 1871; Paris rebelled against their government and took control of the city for two months. Marx then wrote a short treatise about it called The Civil War in France. The First International went into decline after Marx won the battle with Bakunin and supported being transferred from his seat in the General Council from London to New York in

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