How Did John Brown Influence Abolitionism

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In today’s society, many people are afraid to stand up for what they believe in. Most people feel judged and just want to “blend in” like the rest of society. But, there was once a man named John Brown who was not afraid to let others know his beliefs. Brown stood up for what he knew was right, became famous for his historical mark he left on abolitionism, and devised a plan to rebel against slaveholders to end slavery once and for all. John Brown had very strong beliefs that will never be forgotten. It was said that, “The entire Brown family was involved in abolitionist work” (“Valley of the Shadow”). John Brown had a strong passion for abolitionism and was determined to make things right one day. Brown and three of his sons devised a plan …show more content…
He gathered together a group to plan his attack. His main goal was to steal weapons to give to the slaves. He was hoping to get a hold of these weapons so that the slaves had something to use as self defense to break away from their slaveholders. After the news of the raid had been well known throughout the country, “Brown was facing a contingent of U.S. Marines, rushed to Harpers Ferry from Washington, D.C., under the command of Colonel Robert E. Lee” (“American Vision”). Brown was no match to the marines. He was then captured and sent to court. His final sentence was death on December 2, 1859. Brown was such a dedicated man to his values and was even willing to die for what he believed in. As Brown was being killed, his last words were, ‘“I, John Brown, am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away but with Blood. I had as I now think vainly flattered myself that without very much bloodshed it might be done”’ (“American Vision”). In other words, Brown did not feel guilty for the crimes that he committed. He only did what he felt was right in order to retrieve equality for all. Brown had a strong passion for his work and did not mind the consequences he received. Brown understood why he was getting punished, and he also understood that what he did was wrong. But, Brown did what he had to do to get his point across to all of America. He …show more content…
He was constantly sacrificing himself for the well being of others. Even when Brown was fighting to end slavery with very little help, he continued to stick to his own beliefs. Brown’s message he left encouraged Southerners all around to stand up for what was right. During this period of time, Sectionalism was a big problem. As it is shown, the sectionalism was between abolitionist and pro slavery believers. Most of the people living in the South believed in slavery, while the people in the North believed in no slavery. Of course the disagreement between the two caused a great deal of arguments and even deaths. Brown’s life was taken from him for believing in a non-slavery environment. Brown did commit some very extreme crimes that deserved punishment, but, he was so dedicated to his own beliefs, he wanted to ensure a better life for the victims of slavery. Brown’s life story has taught me to always stand up for what I believe in, even if it means standing alone. Brown will leave a legacy that will forever be remembered throughout history. I believe that if Brown were to look down on society today, he would be very pleased by the

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