How Did Frederick Douglass Change America

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The Start of a Changing World Friends are extremely vital to slaves. They continue to get each other through the awful and dreadful hardships of slavery. Slaves are working from sunrise to sunset day in and day out. Many slaves would rather continue the daily struggle with their friends rather than venture out on a quest for freedom. Slaves know what to expect at a plantation, but sneaking away they don’t know where their next meal will be from. There are countless miles walked and countless variables that go in to affect. There is a high reward, but also a high risk for sneaking away from their plantation. The percentage of slaves that have successfully escaped, and have gained true freedom is an extremely low percentage. Fredrick Douglass …show more content…
He met several people like; Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, and Nathan Johnson. These people helped out Fredrick Douglass with everything from money to just helping support his right of freedom. These people continued to push the right of Douglass to have his freedom. In the North, “I found myself even more awkward than a country boy appeared to be in a large city.” (Douglass’s Narrative) There is an extremely low chance Douglass would have been successful at achieving freedom with out the help of other, due to the fact he had nothing to his name. Over the course of other people’s generosity, I believe his attitude towards others changed drastically. His later years he was able to make a help alter several other slaves lives by sharing his story. White people were able to help make a greater push for slaves freedom, and Fredrick really appreciated the help. After receiving his freedom, “In all of his writings and speeches, Douglass’s major concerns were civil rights and human freedom” (Hagler, D. Harland). The push for freedom paid on when the, “emancipation arrived in 1865, former slaves continued to write about their experience of enslavement and their upward struggle to realize the promise of freedom and citizenship.” (Andrews, William

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