Fela Kuti: Corruption In Nigeria

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Fela Kuti was a politician activist and a famous Nigerian musician. Fela utilized the power of music to express the corruption and atrocity of the Nigerian regime. He became an inspirational and influential role model for individuals in Nigeria. Fela is known for his courage and outspokenness against the Nigerian dictatorship of which it gained him the admiration of most young Nigerians citizens. During the 1970s, most Nigerians were living in fear of the Nigerian regime.However, Fela used his music to convey the struggles and hardships he had experienced while he was attempting to express his views and concerns on the issue of human right violation in Nigeria, and he needed to encourage the Nigerian people to free themselves from the fear of Nigerian government. Despite the Nigerian government attempts to silence Fela, that is by imprisoning and also beating him. Nonetheless, this particular treatment from the federal government did not sway him down; instead, he made it his mission to speak in place for the individuals that can not voice their own opinion. His courageousness and rebelliousness against the Nigerian government led him to become one of the most famous and influential men of his day. Fela Kuti came into this …show more content…
Afrobeat was an invention of highlife, jazz, and Black American soul music That is when Fela’s new genre of music Afrobeat started to be the core of his activism. “He sang in “pidgin English,” a mix of Nigerian slang and broken English so that everyone could understand. It was a way to break down lofty philosophy so that the message was clear without compromising the complexities of the

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