Booker T Washington's Philosophy

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Booker T Washington born into slavery in Virginia in 1856 Washington became the most prominent black spokesman in the united states as a result of a speech delivered in the year of Douglass’s death at the Cotton States Exposition in Atlanta Compromise. His philosophy of uplift through submission drew heated criticism from many black leaders. He contended that social, political and civil rights were secondary issues for blacks subordinate to and dependent upon the races economic importance. Washington believed that with his way of teaching and educating the young African Americans was right to him the sensible thing for blacks to do was to fashion a coalition with the whites in power to make themselves indispensable objects to the prosperity …show more content…
In this manner whites keep on regarding ex slaves as though they were still slaves. Washington 's foundation held large portions of its understudy’s hostage to an unbending standard framework like those which slave aces provided for slaves. Understudies were intensely policed on the proper behavior, how to depict themselves, where they ought to walk, who they could communicate with and they weren 't permitted the right to speak freely. Whites refused their slaves to give assessments and prevented them the alternative from securing the right to speak freely, slave owners checked nearly the developments of slaves.

Proof demonstrates that Washington sold out African Americans through his perspectives, his methodology and his teachings. Tuskegee foundation is a prime case of how he designs isolation, mistreatment and congruity. His goals are indistinct and can start contention. Washington latent, stand off methodology wasn 't supported by blacks and didn 't pick up the appreciation from whites, which he expected to get. He kept on setting blacks off guard and in view of absence of hostility they were not able commandingly procure the social liberties which the so

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