Hound Case Study

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Register to read the introduction… Contents [hide] * 1 Etymology and related terminology * 2 Taxonomy * 3 History and evolution * 3.1 DNA studies * 4 Roles with humans * 4.1 Early roles * 4.2 As pets * 4.3 Work * 4.4 Sports and shows * 4.5 As a food source * 4.6 Health risks to humans * 4.7 Health benefits for humans * 4.8 Shelters * 5 Biology * 5.1 Senses * 5.1.1 Vision * 5.1.2 Hearing * 5.1.3 Smell * 5.2 Physical characteristics * 5.2.1 Coat * 5.2.2 Tail * 5.3 Types and breeds * 5.4 Health * 5.4.1 Mortality * 5.4.2 Predation * 5.5 Diet * 5.5.1 Foods toxic to dogs * 5.6 Reproduction * 5.7 Neutering * 5.8 Communication * 6 Intelligence and behavior * 6.1 Intelligence * 6.2 Behavior * 6.3 Dog growl * 7 Differences from wolves * 7.1 Physical characteristics * 7.2 Behavioral differences * 7.3 Trainability * 8 Mythology * 9 Gallery of dogs in art * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 Bibliography * 13 External links …show more content…
It is believed this "dog" type of "hound" was so common, it eventually became the prototype of the category "hound".[17] By the 16th century, dog had become the general word, and hound had begun to refer only to types used for hunting.[18] Hound, cognate to German Hund, Dutch hond, common Scandinavian hund, and Icelandic hundur, is ultimately derived from the Proto-Indo-European *kwon- "dog", found in Sanskrit kukuur (कुक्कुर),[19] Welsh ci (plural cwn), Latin canis, Greek kýōn, and Lithuanian …show more content…
If dogs were domesticated, as believed, roughly 15,000 years ago, the event (or events) would have coincided with a large expansion in human territory and the development of agriculture. This has led some biologists to suggest one of the forces that led to the domestication of dogs was a shift in human lifestyle in the form of established human settlements. Permanent settlements would have coincided with a greater amount of disposable food and would have created a barrier between wild and anthropogenic canine

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