Summary Of Horten's Miraculous Mechanisms

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Reading the book Horten’s Miraculous Mechanisms by Lissa Evans from pages 1 to 117 has been an exhilarating journey so far. I started reading this book a little after the beginning of the year all the way until October 13th. Usually reading mostly at school and some components at home. I have yet to finish it.
Horten’s Miraculous Mechanisms is set a little after World War II and it describes a short ten year old boy named Stuart Horten who is going through a boring and long summer when his father, a crossword designer and his mom, a doctor, have to move houses so that Stuart's mom can be closer to work. Stuart doesn’t like the idea of moving but when he does, series of events take place that lead him through a grand and mysterious adventure.
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Upon arriving at the new house at 20 Beech Road, Stuart claims all the inconveniences of moving to Beeton, but as time passes, he grows to better like the place, similar to how I felt about my new house. This also relates to how you have to be open minded and adaptable to face certain complications in life, which is what both Stuart and I attained. I think that the author’s ideas in the book made me realize how you can apply what you already know to new ideas. For example, when Stuart’s dad said “I lost the thread”, Stuart knew that a thread also meant a spiral path cut into metal. This gave him the idea to twist the bottom of the money box, which Stuart’s dad got from great uncle tony, to reveal a load of coins that fell from the bottom. Similarly, I apply basic knowledge into more perplex or convoluted ideas, like in math class. This also has to do with coincidence, which happens frequently in the book and in my life. Now that I am in grade 9, I have to insure that I hand in all assignments on time or otherwise I will have much more homework and it will get more stressful. Alike, the book as a whole has made me realize that the clues and mysteries that Stuart finds out about his great uncle and his family history can relate to how life is a mystery that must be solved. This is because the decisions that you make can affect how future events will take …show more content…
This is unlike another book called “The Terrible Thing That Happened to Barnaby Brocket”, where it was written in first person which allows an enhanced perspective on the main character. This will show his or her’s biases, stereotypes, and prejudices. The author also uses a lot of complicated but insightful vocabulary like perambulation and prestidigitator. The pace of the book is rapid, but the book is able to vividly describe the characters and settings of who Stuart encounters and where he is. I also noticed that the book was able to portray the personalities of the characters by just providing the dialogue, meaning that each character had kept specific tones, helping with the reader to make inferences on what the character might do next. The book also has a cliffhanger each time Stuart find a clue, because you always want to know what will happen next. At the part where I am reading now, where Stuart is exploring his great uncle’s house, the author uses imagery and figurative language to represent how old the house is and what life might have been like back then. For example, the author writes “Stuart walks along it cautiously, the candle flame dancing.” which provides personification and the sense that Stuart is walking slowly and carefully. Overall, I like how the book is going and can’t wait to

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