Horney Essay

1630 Words Sep 5th, 2011 7 Pages
Women in Psychology Paper
Shanda L. Ludwig
PSY/310
September 11, 2011
Dr. Matt Pearcey

Women in Psychology Paper
It was not until the 1890s that women were allowed access to training in most fields of study, including psychology. Since that time many have made significant theoretical contributions to the field of psychology and our understanding of psychodynamic thought including the works of Karen Horney (1885–1952). She was a psychoanalyst best known for her work on neurosis and coping techniques. Horney was a leading figure in the development of a range of non-orthodox psychoanalytic approaches in mid-twentieth-century America. Often compared to orthodox Freudians, she emphasized interpersonal relations and minimized the
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It was in the United States she began work that would be profound in the field of psychology.
Theoretical Perspective
One of her best known theories was based on neurosis. She defined neurosis as the anxiety or worry that was prevalent in interpersonal relationships. Horney's theory of personality was based on identifying needs that she considered to be neurotic, for example, the need for social recognition, domination, independence, dependence and personal achievement for recognition. She identified three general personality types: a self-effacing or withdrawing personality characterized by the need for independence and perfection; an expansive, aggressive type characterized by the need for power and competitive success; and a compliant, resigning type characterized by self-sacrifice. The neurotic forms of these needs, she argued, distort one's self-perception and thereby reduce the potential for healthy self-realization. Horney assigned great importance to the parental role in the formation of such needs and treated therapy as a way of identifying and overcoming them (Eckardt, 1984). Her neurosis theory proposes that strategies used to cope with anxiety can be mistaken, when overused as needs. According to Horney, basic anxiety or neurosis, could result from a variety of things including, " . . . direct or indirect domination, indifference, erratic

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