Women's Rights In Middle Eastern Countries

1756 Words 8 Pages
It is one of the vilest proscriptions against women: the unlawful killings of at least 20,000 women a year in the name of honor. Contrary to popular beliefs, this taboo is not only confined to Middle Eastern countries. Nevertheless, Middle Eastern countries have set a precedent which has caused a contagion effect that is spreading rapidly to other countries. The murders of these women being buried alive, beheaded, stoned to death, etc. all for the honor of their families, are appalling. According to Wei, et al., “honor killings among immigrant communities in the United Kingdom, states that wives and daughters are murdered by their husbands or fathers, simply because their victim have had the temerity to step out of line, and consequently been …show more content…
Instead, women’s issues should be placed on a higher pedestal because to date, women are still suffering from issues such as underrepresentation in leadership and politics, sexual violence, genitalia mutilation, salary difference, and the deprivation of their innate rights to be educated. First, the government has a long history of gross underrepresentation of women in national and international power politics. According to data compiled by the Inter-Parliamentary Union on the basis of information provided by National Parliaments by 1st August 2016, only one out of five legislative seats worldwide is occupied by a woman. Despite the many strategies that have been coined by various world leaders to combat gender inequality, cultural and societal norms have caused this seemingly progress to be slow and ineffective. Due to the seemingly low representation of women in politics, policies that are important to women and minority groups, in general, are underdeveloped. Many anti-women leaders seize to …show more content…
Diverse news about curtailing sexual violence or assault has often been focused outside of U.S territories. For instance, U.S. official, Secretary John Kerry, has made the fight against sexual assault abroad his agenda. However, I would like to highlight one of the recent cases of sexual assault at “home” that still makes me believe we are living in a barbaric world. Recently on the news, Stanford former athlete, Brock Turner, was given a light sentence after making unwanted sexual advances at an intoxicated woman. Personally, I was appalled at the prosecutors and judge for being too fair on him especially after attempting to flee the scene. Even with the light sentence as being registered as a sex offender, Brock’s father, Dan A. Turner, still had the audacity to write a letter to the public stating “That is a steep price to pay for 20 minutes of action out of his 20 plus years of life” (Kingkade 2016). Situations such as this where the justice system fails to be ethical continue to amplify this wrong state of mind that has been carried on for generations till date: sexual assault towards women and rape culture is alright. This case to me is an

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