Honesty, Openness And A Lack Of Control

1167 Words 5 Pages
According to popular culture, America is obsessed with the phrase “Netflix and chill,” emojis, and whatever new atrocity Miley Cyrus is committing. But I believe that America’s true obsession is with something much less concrete: control. The root of many of our insecurities can be attributed to an abnormal fear of lack of control. Aging, unruly children, and weight gain are all examples of things that feel so undesirable because they communicate to the world that we don’t have control over our lives. Out of this obsession has emerged an interesting sub-culture: the over involved but well-meaning parent, hovering over their child’s every move. A helicopter parent, as we’ve come to know these mothers and fathers, attempts to carefully monitor …show more content…
The list of books that are consistently challenged in educational environments or otherwise are often books that discuss difficult topics with honesty, openness, and a lack of shame. Topics like suicide, sex, drug use and abuse, and violence are all things that, like it or not, we all are associated with at some point in our lives. Literature that delves into the aforementioned topics are uncomfortable to read but educate the reader on the challenges and mindsets of a character outside their own microcosm. 13 Reasons Why, a book focused on suicide, is frequently challenged in schools across the nation. Jay Asher, the author of the book, commented, “I was writing a book about issues that make most people uncomfortable, including me. That alone, I knew, could make it controversial. But these are issues people do experience. To emotionally reach people, I had to write my story honestly” (qtd. in Grinberg). When any work that includes uncomfortable topics is deemed unsuitable for library shelves, honesty is sacrificed. There is a definite place for carefree literature in the library, but if that is the only perspective that a reader can get, we prevent the reader from seeing some of the world’s harshest realities and making …show more content…
In fact, many of the different groups against banning books take this viewpoint: to read is to educate, and why should a person be allowed to determine the way another educates himself? As the amount of books being challenged increases, the authors who are known for writing about controversial topics have begun to hear more and more about their books being looked at with scrutiny and criticism. Judy Blume is one such author. Her many books chronicle adolescence in what some would consider to be an uncensored form, and most have been challenged at some point. In an interview, Blume stated that when her books were first being challenged, she thought, “This is America: we don 't have censorship, we have freedom to read, freedom to write, freedom of the press, we don 't do this, we don 't ban books” (qtd. in Flood). One would think that with freedom of press comes the freedom to read that which has been written and published. But more and more, these freedoms seem to mean different things to different people in the battle over books. Not only does it prevent people from reading what they want, but it also imposes the views of a select group of people onto all people. In an interview, high school English teacher Lisa Lacy said, “[Banning books implies] that people don’t have the rational ability

Related Documents