Homosexuality: The Stonewall Riots

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Homosexuality was a crime for most of the United States history. As early as the 20th-century people were working discreetly until the Stonewall riots of 1969 for the acceptance of people who are gay in society. The Stonewall Riots were a major turning point for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) community. It was beginning of societal awareness of the persecution and needed rights of the LGBT community. This seminal conflict eventually led to increased social acceptance and legal rights for this community and by 2015, gay marriage became legal in all 50 states through these uncompromising efforts.
Being a member of the LGBT community during the 1960’s was a special kind of challenge they faced especially because they had a different
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The Stonewall Inn was violating the law in several ways including the club lacked a fire exit, running water behind the bar to wash glasses, clean toilets that didn’t routinely overflow, and drinks that aren't watered down beyond recognition. But the main concern was that they didn't have a license to sell alcohol. They were registered as a bottle bar which means that the people that went to the bar could bring their own alcohol but the bar couldn’t sell it to their patrons. Even though the police had a lawful excuse to invade the bar, people have suspected that they were mainly targeting gay bars and people who were promoting and accepting of …show more content…
In the beginning, they were angry and agitated and threw items but eventually, it turned into a peaceful protest. The aftermath of the riots included walking around New York City in peaceful protest and just showing their way of life. Even though there were a lot more police than protesters, the protests went on. People stood in the streets and danced, kissed and held hands to show everyone that it is acceptable to be LGBT and that they are just people and their relationships are as valid as any heterosexual relationship. These protests were received in two different way the heterosexual community foud these protests to be too flashy and disrupting but the LGBT community found it was necessary to gain the acceptance of there way of life. These protests and demonstrations lasted for six days and nights. This was the impetus for the acceptance and recognition of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community and it helped start and continue organizations that fight for the LGBT rights. Eventually, Marsha P. Johnson and Silvia Rivera created the organization S.T.A.R. which stood for Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries. Other organizations that were founded after the riots include the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activist

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