Homesteading Essay

2258 Words 10 Pages
The modern homesteading community, is one of people seeking self-reliance and independence for a myriad of reasons through small scale independent farming and food preservation and crafting. The homesteader is more that just a famer and embodies a broad and contradictory spectrum of motives, affiliations, and material practices. (Wilbur, p.154). As Rebeca Kneale Gould states “the homesteader has converted to a new way of life in which the practice of everyday life is a chosen ‘answer’ to a particular constellation of personal, social and cultural questions” (p. 191). Just as diverse as the people, so to are the labels this community and lifestyle have been given. While homesteaders are the most common terms used by researchers and the community …show more content…
Rebeca Gould discusses in her article and book the similarities between organized religion and that of homesteader’s lifestyle. She refers to how autobiographies of other homesteaders become like sacred text with guidelines of how to live for the would be back-to-the-lander. “Many have well-stocked libraries of books and magazines on simple living with serve as testament to a way of living that is both practical and philosophical, not just ‘how-to’ but ‘why you should’” (Gould, 1999,191). Nature becomes the physical and symbolic center of one’s existence. (Gould, 2015), Vannini and Taggart also find that the practice of homesteading is meeting the behavioral need of spirituality in the community. Many homesteaders admit that although it is backbreaking to try and be self sufficient, it’s a lifestyle that puts him in touch with nature and the ‘creator’” (2014, p 328). Jacob discovered in his survey that although 41 percent of homesteaders do not attend church many consider themselves to be spiritually sensitive but decline to express their …show more content…
These ideals lead to political radicalism which manifests its self in practices of self-sufficiency, alternative economic structures and experiment in social organization” (2013, p. 149). The lifestyle itself is political activism. Jacob expounds on this by stating that time constrained homesteaders first priorities are that of the home although 51 percent belong to an activist organization and 10 percent work with activist groups (Jacob, 2199,

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