The Characterization Of Ideas In Homer's Iliad

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The art of copying, transforming, and combining elements of literature, otherwise known as remixing, is one of the most commonly used strategies for creating stories. It has been meticulously developed and improved upon throughout time and has since lead to a great number of popular movies, books, and songs. This technique dates back to some of the first poems and epics ever created. Even before writing was invented, there were traces of remixing through oral tradition. Stories would be passed down by word of mouth and changed ever so slightly from person to person, that eventually the story became a fusion of many similar stories. Homer’s Iliad is a perfect example of remix culture through its use of both familiar and novel ideas, as well …show more content…
If a story has too novel of ideas people can’t relate and often don’t know how to respond, but if it’s too familiar, people start to think that it was just a knockoff or a flat out remake. This is a very fine line to walk, but if done correctly, the outcome could be revolutionary. Homer uses characters such as the gods that everyone at the time was familiar with to add an element that people could connect to. Homer writes, “The Olympian gods in the house of Zeus were troubled by what had happened, when Hephaistos, known for his craft, said this, bringing kindness to his dear mother Hera…” (I.560-563). The Greeks all worshipped the same gods so they all knew what Homer was talking about when he mentioned certain characters. This level of familiarity is what separated the Iliad from other poems at the …show more content…
This tale was originally passed down by word of mouth and so it had to be recited from memory. This meant that many versions of the Iliad were spoken before Homer crafted the original that we all know today. It was up to him to copy, transform, and combine certain elements and to make one of the very first remixes. This is a tale that has a number of exotic influences and perfectly encapsulates the views and lifestyles of the ancient

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