Homelessness And Urban Development In Toronto

2248 Words 9 Pages
Toronto is the commercial, cultural and financial center of Canada and is recognized as a prominent and influential global city. Therefore, Toronto is constantly changing to best adapt to both domestic and international trends. In recent years, there has been a boom in condominium development in the city of Toronto with, “sales increasing by 21.2% in the first quarter of 2015 compared to the first quarter of the previous year” (Vital signs, 2016). With the increasing number of condominium development in the city of Toronto, significant changes in city planning and population settlement has become increasingly more noticeable. The continuous development of more condominiums into the city allows for a more concentrated population living in close …show more content…
According to a study of homelessness in Toronto, racialized and immigrant families are over represented in inadequate housing with conditions of overcrowding and health concerns. They are also more likely to be evicted, as their income is not necessarily sufficient enough (Paradis, Logan, & Wilson, 2014, p. 5). There are certain groups in ethnic enclaves or neighbourhoods that live in less than desirable living conditions and with the boom in condominium development throughout Toronto, certain groups are unable to keep up with the rising prices in rent. The city’s intention to increase urban development does not help protect marginalized groups from becoming homelessness and there are not enough government social programs to help these individuals. Both August Martine and the article discussing homelessness in Toronto, agree that urban development in the form of condominiums does not necessarily benefit everyone in the city. However, these issues are ignored in favour of the city’s efforts to make profits and attract …show more content…
In the context of the urban political economic theory, it is quite evident that there is a power structure rooted in capitalist relations, in which the city official or government are using these spaces at the disinterest of certain groups that are marginalized and deemed of lesser importance. As mentioned earlier, the case study of Little Portugal seems to suggest that local or native businesses in ethnic enclaves are often displaced. However, there seems to be some industries that use the cultural identity of these ethnical enclaves to promote multiculturalism and promote the personal agendas of the city. Both Jack Hackworth and Josephine Rekers believe that, “The commercial areas of these neighbourhoods now function increasingly as ways to market each neighbourhood’s residential real estate markets. (Hackworth & Rekers, 2005, p.211)” Although local entrepreneurs are displaced in ethnic enclaves to some extent, the commercial industries in these neighbourhoods use forms of the culture of the ethnic enclaves to attract and appeal to both foreign investors and urban professionals. However, the promotion of the culture does not necessarily benefit these ethnic groups, since they cannot afford to

Related Documents