Ethnic Cleansing Holocaust

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Based on my studies of genocides and the Holocaust, I have come to the conclusion that genocide’s do not always require a powerful leader in order for such tragic horrors to take place. On the contrary, it takes a merciless and inhuman organization of individuals led by a commander in order for such catastrophe to occur. Even as an adult who had no involvement in the Holocaust, the validity behind the extermination of Jews can still resonate tremendous sorrow and guilt for what occurred. I believe that children should be mature of age in order distinguish that where ever there is good, there can also be evil. Without this awareness of good and evil, students can face a problematic time sympathizing and understanding why such horrific events …show more content…
Ethnic cleansing can take action through deportation, sterilization, and ultimately mass murders. The Holocaust performed by German Nazi’s, is considered to be one of the largest genocides to take place in the world. Due to the six million people murdered under the ruling of a government leader, Adolf Hitler, the Holocaust is considered both genocide and a democide. The Holocaust falls into par with scientist R. J. Rummel’s concept of democide. Scientist R. J. Rummel graphically constructed the word genocide to fall into three different categories. These categories consist of legal meaning, common meaning, and generalized meaning. Each meaning stands its own purpose of describing the bounteous ways the government can undergo the act of genocide. Rummel describes a democide as another version of genocide, one that is conducted under the order of the government and solely the government (Rummel, …show more content…
As a result, victims of the Nazi army were forced from their homes and sentenced to live in ghettos and/or were rapidly transported by train to concentration camps. A well-known concentration camp by the name of Auschwitz became the extermination center to over one million Jewish citizens. Victims experienced a magnitude of horrors inside the walls of Auschwitz. Every single day, Jewish prisoners faced a grisly life, having to endure living in feces and excrement’s, while also waiting in fear of when they would be a part of the next round of execution (Lewinska, 1993). Execution took place through gas chambers, gallows, mass shooting, starvation and even experimental tests were performed. As stated by the Holocaust Museum (Museum, Racism: An Overview, 2016), there were leaders of the church that protested the mistreatment of Jews and tried to help potential Jewish prisoners seek refuge from the Nazi’s. With the help of the church, a resolution was passed that denounced the Nazi army for their invasive maltreatment towards Jews. However, not all bystanders were so eager to help Jewish refugees. Around the time of the Holocaust, in 1933, the United States set strict limitations to the number of immigrants that were allowed into the country. The new immigration restraints in the U.S. would have allowed less than 0.6% of the number of Holocaust victims to enter the country with a visa. Later on in 1938, thirty-two nations appeared at a conference to discuss the concerns of

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