Hoarding Disorder Case Study

Improved Essays
Have you ever loved one diagnosed with hoarding disorder? A mother describes a situation with her son having a small Christmas tree set up in his bedroom, and his sister and brother in law visiting while eating off dinner trays in his room. (BÜScher, 2013). The family formed a sanctuary amongst the clutter, to savor the moment. Hoarding disorder develops into a manifestation of possessions causing conflict amongst the living area. The individual suffering from the hoarding disorder commonly suffers from mild to severe anxiety, depression or loneliness. Furthermore, to discover the effects of hoarding on families, researching the effects on children growing into adolescence, and as an adult creates an understanding of the growth of the disorder …show more content…
According to the DSM 5 (2013), hoarding disorder is defined as having difficulties discarding or separating themselves from possessions, regardless of actual value. The behavior typically has negative effects leading to emotional, physical or financial distress for the individual enduring the disorder and surrounding family and friends. These particular individuals accumulate a large number of possessions that clutter everyday living areas of their domain until the purpose of the living area is no longer an option.
Annotated Bibliography
BÜScher, T. P., Dyson, J., & Cowdell, F. (2014). The effects of hoarding disorder on families: an integrative review. Journal Of Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing, 21(6), 491-498 8p. doi:10.1111/jpm.12098 Hoarding disorder has emerged onto the scenes as a fairly recent diagnosis, formerly known as a side effect of over-compulsive disorder. According to BÜScher, affiliated with the faculty of health and social care located at the University of Hull in 2013, the effects of hoarding on family members were researched through integrative interviews. There was a total of 10 relatives being conducted the interview process without the individual suffering from the hoarding disorder involved. The results led to three different themes with subcategories following. The effects of hoarding on family members were referred to as quality of life,
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Z., Mataix-Cols, D., Serlachius, E., Lichtenstein, P., Anckarsäter, H., Chang, Z., & ... Rück, C. (2013). Prevalence, comorbidity and heritability of hoarding symptoms in adolescence: a population based twin study in 15-year olds. Plos ONE, 8(7), 1-7. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069140 A population study was conducted with twins from the Sweden community to examine the genetic and environmental influences of hoarding. The study was based around twins, 45% being male, and 55% being female. Of the 100%, 30% were identical and 30% were fraternal, 26% were fraternal twins of the opposite sex and 14% are of an unknown zygote. (Ivanov, Matrix-Cols, Serlachius, Lichtenstein, Anckarsäter, Chang, & … Rück, 2013). The twins involved were surveyed at the age of 9 or 12 years of age, the questionnaire was completed by their parents, once the twins aged to 15 years an additional questionnaire was established with parental consent. The twins would conduct a Hoarding Rating Scale-Self Report (HRS-SR) the report is created from five items measured on a 9-point Likert type scale (Ivanov, Matrix-Cols, Serlachius, Lichtenstein, Anckarsäter, Chang, & … Rück, 2013). Genetic influences were evident in the growing stages of childhood. In addition, the symptoms involved with hoarding disorder resulted in signs of OCD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), depression, and/or anxiety. The results illustrated that

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