Hitler's Role In Nazi Germany

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The beginning of World War II and Hitler’s role in it is a very long and interesting one, like most wars it was a series of events that led to the ultimate conflict. Let 's start off in January of 1919 with Anton Drexler. Drexler had just founded the German Workers’ Party (DAP) inside the Fuerstenfelder hotel in Munich, a few months before-hand Hitler demobilized in Munich due to an almost complete demilitarisation of German forces. After Hitler’s return he was assigned intelligence agent by a reconnaissance commando of the Reich Defence. His mission was to infiltrate the German Workers’ Party, but Hitler took a liking to Anton Drexler’s ideologies while spying on them. (Kershaw, 2008, p. 82). Consequently Hitler got into an argument with Professor …show more content…
Subsequently Hitler did what any power hungry individual in the 1900s would do and staged a coup resulting in his imprisonment, during which he wrote his popular autobiography Mein Kampf(My Struggle). He started gaining momentum after his release in 1924 with Nazi Propaganda and by criticizing the Treaty of Versailles claiming it’s ruining the German Nation. The Nazi Party soon became the largest elected party in the German Weimar Republic with the help of Hitler, leading to his appointment of chancellor in 1933. Once he obtained chancellor the Reichstag passed the Enabling Act, allowing Hitler to enact laws without the involvement of the Reichstag. This started the process of turning the Weimar Republic into Nazi Germany, a dictatorship ruled by a …show more content…
Neville Chamberlain, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom didn’t want to start a war with Germany, but was left with no other choice as Germany failed to withdraw troops from Poland by September 2nd. With the help of the Soviet Union, Hitler was able to capture Poland and annexed the west and south, while the Soviet Union annexed the east and north. But Hitler still wasn’t happy with just his successful invasion of Poland because he believed that "the organization of a Russian state formation was not the result of the political abilities of the Slavs in Russia, but only a wonderful example of the state-forming efficacy of the German element in an inferior race.". (Adolf, 1925, Chapter 14 - Eastern Orientation or Eastern Policy). This motivated Hitler to invade Russia on the 22nd of June in 1941 lasting until the 5th of December. The attack ultimately resulted in land gains for Germany and devastating setbacks for both sides with Germany failing to capture

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