The Women's Rights Movement

Amazing Essays
When the constitution was drafted and signed in 1787 , it limited the rights women were given. Only men were seen as “persons”, whereas women were seen as lesser. For many years women were denied basic rights that men were given, such as the right to vote, the right to own land, and were not allowed to have the same jobs as men. Women more often than not took care of the house and children while the man of the house went out and worked. If women did get a job their choices were limited. This inequality caused the Women’s Rights movement to be started, and the Women’s Suffrage movement followed soon after. The Women’s Suffrage movement was an important part of American history because it caused the ratification of the 19th amendment, which …show more content…
It was held in New York and held around 300 people, 40 of which were men. At the convention, the speakers talked about the inequalities that women faced. The convention was organized by many women who were involved in abolitionist and temperance movements, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The Declaration of Sentiments was the document that was drafted during the convention and debated over the course of two days and signed by some of the attendees. It was loosely based upon the declaration of independence; however they made lots of changes which would benefit women. The convention spread the idea that women deserved to have more rights to other …show more content…
Lucretia became an advocate for women’s rights after being refused “a seat in 1840 at the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London” because she was a woman. She aided Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others in organizing the Seneca Falls convention and was later “elected president of the group in 1852” . Later on Lucretia suffered from extreme stomach problems, however she did not let that gt in the way of her work. She was very determined and set on fighting for women’s rights. By not focusing only on the women’s suffrage movement and fighting for equal rights for women, Lucretia Mott became a well-rounded suffragist who helped women get the right to

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