History of the Juvenile Justice System Essay

1506 Words Apr 18th, 2012 7 Pages
RUNNING HEAD: HISTORY OF THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

Juvenile Delinquency:
The History of the Juvenile Justice System

Shandi Lillard
Kaplan University
CJ 150 – 02
Professor Raymond Keefauvor
June 14, 2011

The History of the Juvenile Justice System

The Juvenile Justice System is seen by many as being ineffective in treating the youth of this country, the programs are outdated and there seems to be little, if any hope that these youth will stay on the right path once released back into society. This paper will discuss the history of the Juvenile Justice System as well as how it has evolved since its inception. We will also discuss the “waiver process” that is used when transferring juveniles into the adult system, and what,
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It was in the 1960’s that big changes were made to the Juvenile Justice System when after two separate cases involving juveniles made it to the Supreme Court, the rights of Due Process were awarded to juveniles. After hearing the cases of Kent v. United States, 383 U.S. 541 (1966), and In re Gault, 387 U.S. 1 (1967), the Supreme Court made the decision that juveniles should have the same rights of due process as awarded to adult offenders. Justice Fortas stated that “neither the Fourteenth Amendment nor the Bill of Rights is for adults alone” and that during delinquency hearings juvenile would be allowed certain elements of Due Process to ensure that they were treated fairly (Americanbar.org). This decision led people to wonder if the country was staying true to the mission of the juvenile system of rehabilitation, because by allowing juveniles the right to due process we were changing juvenile proceedings into criminal proceedings and that was not the goal of the juvenile system. Juveniles are to be rehabilitated, while adults are to be punished. Another issue that is greatly debated when it comes to the juvenile system is the waiver process in which juveniles are transferred into the adult system due to the severity of their crime. Currently 46 states give juvenile

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