Essay about History of Education

1012 Words Jun 15th, 2009 5 Pages
In the decades that made up the fifties, sixties, and seventies numerous events that would paint the canvas of American education took place. Equality was an idea that some thought we would never see. Civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr. saw this idea of equity as an obtainable dream that was in the hearts of all Americans. Though desegregation and the fair treatment of African Americans was at the forefront of the civil rights movement, there were several issues that would be brought to the attention of law makers, federal judges, and the education system. Such issues included segregation, bilingual students, and special needs education. In 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered the opinion of the court in one of the …show more content…
Aaron was presented to the Supreme Court. The request by the Little Rock Arkansas School Board to temporarily suspend their plan to desegregate was denied. It was the thought of the Chief Justices that if this request was granted it would be the first of many attempts to delay desegregation thereby further hindering the education of African American students. Subsequent Supreme Court decisions in cases such as Green v. Kent County School Board (1968), U.S. v. Montgomery County (1969), and Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg (1971), were all in support of desegregation. Title IV of the CRA of 1964 called for the desegregation of public schools. Title VI assured nondiscrimination when funds were distributed to federally assisted programs. Years of turmoil and strife led to the 1974 Equal Education Opportunities Act (EEOA). The EEOA provided that no state could deny equal education based on race, color, sex or national origin. The EEOA pointed out a set of students that had been previously overlooked. Those of different national origin also had a different native language. The case of Lau v. Nichols addressed the needs of bilingual students. It was ruled that school districts must provide remedies for non-English speaking students. The ASPIRA Consent Decree of the same year required that Limited English Proficient (LEP) students must be taught, at least partly, in their native language. A year later, in 1975, the National Association of Bilingual Education was

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