History And Health Issues In Everything Is Broken By Emma Larkin

1095 Words 4 Pages
I have always followed world events, needing to know what is happening in the world is important to me. Therefore, when natural disasters occur, I am following the unfolding situation. However, on May 2nd, 2008 a catastrophic cyclone hit Myanmar, killing over 100,000 people in a small area of the country. Everything is Broken by Emma Larkin recounts the events of that day through the stories of survivors and explores the historical and political implications that lead to the blockade of humanitarian aid. The purpose of this paper is to explore how this book contributed to my learning, the issue of human rights and health, how history and politics can influence health issues and how this novel has expanded my idea of to work with countries whose …show more content…
This sets the reader up for an understanding of the historical and political climate the general ruler Than Shwe was raised in and how foreign powers may have created distrust in the ruling party. Larkin also explains recent events that highlight human rights violations, such as the massacre of monks who protested for democracy in 2007. The final section begins to put the pieces together from part two. Now that the read understands the historical context behind Myanmar’s current history, there is a better understanding as to why to government reacted the way that it did. The military junta feared that allowing aid agencies into the country would spark a revolution (similar to 2007) or there would be an attempt to overthrow the government by the “Western” powers to continue the spread of …show more content…
The issue of lack of access to humanitarian aid (medical care) to the affected area was a violation of human rights. According to the United Nations Human Rights Declaration, article 25 states, that everyone person has a “standard of living adequate for health,” this includes “food, clothing, housing and medical care.” When the military junta denied access to humanitarian aid, they denied the basic essentials to human rights. This was an area of the country that lived and survived off the land, the cyclone destroyed not only houses but also livelihoods. There was no support from the government to rebuild the lives for the people; many had to live in extreme poverty months after the cyclone. Human rights and health was also highlighted during the government’s reaction to the monk protest in 2007. Many protesters were injured when the military began to shoot and beat the protesters. Larkin explained that those wounded who were not arrested, feared to seek medical help, as they would have been arrested once they arrived at the hospital. Larkin also discussed that those were sent to detentions centers did not fair well either. She recounts a story by one of the prisoners that many people died because they did not receive medical care for their wounds. Regardless, if the protesters broke the law, they still had a right to access to medical

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