Ten Commandments Of The Bill Of Rights

1297 Words 6 Pages
The Bill of Rights is one of the most important pieces of The Constitution. The first Ten Commandments of The Constitution are what make up the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights lists specific prohibitions on governmental power, and the whole point of it being created, was to put a limit on the power of the Government. If it wasn’t for the Bill of Rights, the Government would be far more invasive than it already is. People of our country are meant to be able to have their own rights, and belief systems. (Aclu Article) “After All, it wasn’t the government 's job to tell people how to live their lives, and what religion to believe in.” (Pg. 9) James Madison, also known as the “Father of the Constitution,” was a founding father of the United …show more content…
The Bill of Rights was created for the people, James Madison felt that the people of the United States deserved more rights than they already had. The first Ten commandments were, The right to bear arms. The housing of soldiers. Protection from unreasonable searches, and seizures. Protections of rights to Life, Liberty, and property. Rights of accused persons in criminal cases. Rights in Civil cases. Excessive bail, fines, and punishment forbidden. Other rights kept by the people. Undelegated powers kept by the states, and the people. These first 10 rights were ratified, because they were the most important. Later down the road came the rest of the rights. To this day the Bill of Rights is one of the most important documents because it helps regulate the powers of the government in relation to its people. The Bill of Rights, is very important to the citizens to protect their rights and prevent the federal government from misusing its powers against the citizens. If there were no Bill of Rights, the government would take advantage, which would cause unhappiness in our country. People would want to live else where, and wouldn’t feel proud and free to live in the United States. The Bill of Rights limited government role and gave the people certain rights that the government couldn’t provide. Overall, the importance of the document back then, versus …show more content…
The Bill of Rights gave people rights that the government could not take away. In 1789 most of the delegates in the Constitutional convention felt it was necessary to create rights they believed should be present in the rights of mankind. All the way back to the day that the first 10 commandments were ratified, up until present times, there have been controversies surrounding the document. In 1789 the house reluctantly took Madison’s ideas into consideration. Federalists did not find it necessary to have a Bill of Rights, they felt as if things were just fine the way they were. Anti Federalists on the other hand wanted the direct opposite. “The Anti-Federalists were the people who did not favor ratification of the Constitution.” (Pg.1) Anti-Federalists believed that the greatest threat to the future of the United States was in the government 's potential to become corrupt and take more and more power until its rule dominated the people. The hardest part was getting all of the states to agree with the Founding Fathers, and what they wanted to do. Not everyone agreed, or had the same opinion, which resulted in ratifications happening months and months after the new ideas first came about. (MontanaStandard) “James Madison and other Federalists opposed adding a bill of rights. They argued that the

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