Hippie Movement Analysis

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As a way to peacefully protest the unjust involvement of American troops within the “Vietnamese Conflict” a movement swept the nation known as the “Hippies”. The Hippies used peaceful protest to try and spread love and express the immoral conducts of the United States government, unfortunately this peaceful movement led to violent revolts and persecution of the young adolescent protestors by the American protection services. This use of unnecessary violence and prosecution, by the American protection services, led to nationwide distrust of the United States government. Taking a stand against what they believed to be an unnecessary war led to unjust persecution. Originating in Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, the Hippie movement was a new form of activism that expressed their belief that people should “make love not war”. Many people became associated the Hippie Movement during the …show more content…
Aniko Bodroghkozy author of "Groove Tube" expressed his view of hippies based on their excessive drug use and promiscuity; describing the group as “repulsive” and “the most despised group in America” . Bodroghkozy Neglected to realize that they embraced aspects of eastern philosophy, expressed belief in equality, and sought to find new meaning in life through peace and acceptance. The Hippie Movement influenced also television, film, popular music, literature, art, and technology. The Hippie Movement allowed for greater acceptance of religious and cultural diversity. Even fashion was impacted allowing people to dress more casually in the work environment. The use herbs and plants for different purposes such as medicine arose, along with the search for different sources of clean energy. The Hippie stereotypes are not truths, as well as showing that The Hippie Movement was an important

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