Hip-Hop Impact On American Culture

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Today’s culture in America is a very diverse one. It derives from different ethnicities or groups of people. America as a country has the type of culture that is always changing. Weather that be a style of fashion, type of music, or even food, the American culture is always changing. One type of music in particular has had a huge impact on American culture as a whole. That type of music being Hip-Hop. This type of music changed the dynamic of the music industry from the moment it became popular in America. The music genre Hip-Hop has had a huge impact on American culture and started a revolution in not only African American culture, but for many different ethnicities too.

The genre of Hip-Hop music began in the 1970’s during the civil rights
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Rap derives from the term "rapper" which is a person who sings or writes the lyrics over a certain beat. The history of rap can be divided into three categories, early rap, new revolution rap, and today's mainstream rap. The main focus of early rap was basic rhymes and lyrics to make their music sound more clever or unique. Metaphores and smilies were also used to make their lyrics more personable. As the years progressed rap Began to evolve and the lyrics became more and more creative. A huge part of this "evolution" was the art of what is called freestyling. Freestyling is a form of rap in which someone would come up with lyrics on the spot which gave birth to "rap battles". Rap battles consist of two people rapping lyrics back and forth, insulting one another as they go. The winner would be determined when one of the persons rapping would leave the stage in shame. Theses battles began to bring up a much deeper threat to rappers. In their albums, some rappers would openly threaten each other. Some examples of such behavior are how Dr. Dre and Eazy-E would threaten Tupac, and the Notorious B.I.G. The latter two rappers just mentioned, that being Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G, were both killed in a drive-by shooting. Some still speculate to this day that a couple of the east coast rappers were responsible for their deaths, however, these rappers had a strict "no snitch" code. The genre of rap music was not receiving the best press from this. As rap was becoming more and more popular, the African American culture was changing. They wanted to dress as the artists of their day did. That being saggy pants and loose fitting outfits in general. This being that many artists of the day we in prison and that was how they wore their clothes in prison. Regardless of this bad press rap began to take to the big screen. Rappers began to show how they came up and became famous, " such

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