Heteronormativity And Gender Identity

Superior Essays
Heteronormativity is the belief that people can be categorised into definite and interdependant genders, women and male. It postulates that heterosexuality is the only sexual orientation. This ideology states that sexual relations between these two genders are most suitable within opposite sexes. These views are based in relation to biological sex, gender indentity, sexuality and gender roles.

Gender refers to the socially constructed roles, behaviours, actvivities and attributes that a given society considers to be appropriate for men and women. (Who.int)
It differentiates between masculinity and feminity and is essentially a performance. These characteristics are taught to from the cradle. Influences such as popular culture, mass media
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Heth, C. Donald (2009)
Sexuality refers to which gender you are romatically attracted to, regardless regardless of the other persons sexual orientation or biological sex. Your private sense and the subjective experiences defines your personal identity.

Biological sex is the physical sexual reproductive organs that woman and men are catagorically born with. This however does not necessarily dictate what gender they identify with psychologically, or which gender they are sexually attracted to physically or emotionally. It is merely a sexual reproductive organ.
Shiloh Pitt is an example of androgeny of the “other” gender. She is biologically born a female but depsite her being too young to determine her sexual identity, she breaks gender stereotypes of a little girl that wears pink and plays with dolls.

Shiloh may be assumed masculine in the way she dresses, and behaves socially, but she could identify herself later on as heterosexual, homosexual, asexual, transgender or androgenous or cross dresser. It can therefore be assumed that before a certain age people are gender neutral and that society can influence those roles but the innner knowing of sexual preference is a subjective
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Full figured, glamourous and submissive, signifying her gentle nature. This is a simlar technique applied in the Victorian era when male painters portrayed full figured sexualised, submissive women, adorned naked in an erotic fashion.
This was done purely for the pleasure of men, through a males perspective. Kim is depicted by the media as famous for being famous, and good at looking good. Kim plays the role of a feminine sex siren and domesticated mother, through the media’s “male gaze”. Men take pleasure in objectifying her good looks for fantasy purposes, and women look at her in admiration. Her success and good looks are seen as desirable or inspirational for the average woman on the street because that same woman recognises that Kim Kardashian is seen as more aesthically desireable to a man.

On the other hand, Kanye West is protrayed as this powerful, robust and influencial figure within popular culture. He is masculinity personified in that he is the provider to Kim more than she is capable of doing without his status. Kanye’s high ranking status within the music industry puts him at the top of the hierachy like a CEO of a company or Prime Minister of a country. Wests inflated self esteem is brushed off by the media as him having that “mannish angularity”. (Hollows,

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