Hestia In Ancient Greece

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Hestia represented the hearth, familiarity, and comfort. Hestia is the chief of all goddesses (“The Gods of Greece” 168). According to Plato, Hestia means 'the essence of things' (“The Gods of Greece” 168). Hestia is the goddess of the hearth. She receives the best in offerings (“The Gods of Greece” 168). Hestia is the least personal goddess and the most anonymous. She gave her throne on Olympus up for Dionysus. (“The Gods of Greece” 168) The Ancient Greeks believed that “Hestia's fire, her life energy, burned for the city, but, even more important, it burned for each individual, each human soul ” (“The Gods of Greece” 168). She is very kind, and is the center of many things (“The Gods of Greece” 168). The Odyssey shows Athena talking to …show more content…
The Olympic games originated in Olympia, Greece. They consisted of various different sporting events in which competitors competed in. They competed for prizes as well as the satisfaction of winning. ("Olympic Games" 1) The Satyr Plays was an interesting festival that the Ancient Greeks participated in, “In ancient Greek drama festivals, short comic plays featuring the bawdy antics of satyrs, mythical creatures half man and half goat” ("Satyr Plays" 1). Lycaea was a festival in honor of Zeus. It occurred at Mount Lycaea. It involved human sacrifice and lycanthropy, assuming the form of a wolf. (“Lycea” 1) The festival Eleusinia was for worshipping Demeter, goddess of agriculture. It consisted of games and contests. It happened every two years. Every second Eleusinia was more prominent, known as Great Eleusinia. It occurred between August and September. It thanked Demeter for the grain she provided for the people (“Eleusinia” 1). The panathenaea celebrated the goddess Athena. It was celebrated every four years. It was a spectacular festival. It consisted of sacrifices and Athena's robe (“Panathenaea” 1). In The Odyssey, Antinoos explains the importance of holidays in Ancient Greece, "Antínoös said: “Come to yourself. You know that is not the way this business ends. Today the islanders held holiday, a holy day, no day to sweat over a bowstring. Keep your head. Postpone the bow. I say we leave the axes planted …show more content…
At the heart of Greece was the Agora. It was the gathering, market, and governmental place. It was a beautiful and open decorated with splendid architecture ("Cities, Greek" 5). Ancient Greek houses were small and made of mud bricks. It was very dirty and crowded. It did not have many things, such as running water, a garbage disposal, or a sewage system. With the formation of the characteristic Greek poleis during the eighth and seventh centuries B.C.E. and the nearly universal disappearance in Greece of the institution of monarchy, the inhabitants of most Greek cities came to regard two questions about status as fundamental: (1) whether one was a citizen or an alien, that is, someone from some other polis (a Greek) or culture (a "barbarian"); and (2) whether a person was free or a slave. All other issues, such as wealth, gender, or age, were of lesser importance, even if they were subsets of the main issues ("Cities, Greek" 3). In Ancient Greece slaves were commonly used. Slaves did all the dirty work. They were not free and did not get paid ("Ancient Greece" 3). Ancient Greece was ruled under a monarchy, but then switched to become a democratic country ("Ancient Greece" 3). Here Eurymakhos is explaining the role of a man to Telemakhos, “But keep your property, and rule your house, and let no man, against your will, make havoc of your possessions, while there’s life on Ithaka”

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