Hero's Journey In The Odyssey

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The epic revolves around the journeys of the hero Odysseus and the lands that he passes on his journey back to Ithaca. He is faced with many perilous stops on his return to his home of Ithaca. The gods determine the fate of Odysseus as he makes advances towards his home. One of the ordeals that he is dealt, is being trapped on the nymph Calypsos island. This is the outcome of Odysseus and his men outraging the goddess Athena, so she unleashes the seas upon them killing all but Odysseus. Earlier in the epic, the hero and his crew come upon the cave of the cyclops, Polyphemus, who traps Odysseus forcing the hero to use his intelligence to outwit the one-eyed cyclops. Upon, his journey to the Phaeacians, Poseidon interferes due to the blinding …show more content…
There all the rest of his loyal shipmates died but the wind drove him on, the current bore him here.” (Homer 81). After seven years of being trapped on the island, the gods met in council to determine the fate of Odysseus. Zeus degrees that, “Announce to the nymph with lovely braids our fixed decree: Odysseus journeys home—the exile must return. But not in the convoy of the gods or mortal men. No, on a lashed, makeshift raft and wrung with pains.” (78). This stands as an example of the gods determining the fate of Odysseus from the island of Ogygia. They state that he will be allowed to leave the island but only on a rash that is made by made by him. The message is delivered to Calypso, from the messenger god, Hermes. Odysseus wise from the overwhelming perils of his journey does not believe the will of the gods: “Passage home? Never. Surely, you’re plotting something else, goddess, urging me—in a raft— to cross the ocean’s mighty gulfs.” (81-82). Upon being reassured by Calypso, Odysseus takes to the creation of his raft, and completes it in four days and then sails to the Phaeacians on the fifth day. Thus, making it through this ordeal of the gods and one step closer to his …show more content…
However, Forman states, “The seafaring Phaeacians themselves suffer permanent hardship for their good deed: Poseidon landlocks their harbors in retribution for Odysseus’s having blinded Polyphemus the Cyclops, the sea-god’s monster son.” (Forman 1). This shows that the actions of the gods surpass that of just Odysseus. After a short period of time Odysseus leaves for him home. When he arrives, he takes shelter with the pig herder Eumaios. Odysseus disguises himself as a beggar and then goes to visit the palace. When it came time to deal with the suitors, Odysseus gets all the suitors in one place and manages to trap them there. Athena appears in the form of young Odysseus mentor: “Zeus’s daughter Athena, taking the build and voice of Mentor, swept in…” (371). Yet, Athena seeks to test Odysseus’s fighting prowess: “he gave no all-out turning of the tide, not yet, she kept on testing Odysseus and his gallant son, putting their force and fighting heart to proof.” (371). Leaving them during battle to take command. Odysseus prevails over the suitors in the end claiming back his home of Ithaca, with the guidance and assistance of Athena making it all

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