Henry Viii Personality

711 Words 3 Pages
Confident, fearless and handsome, King Henry VIII had the making of a perfect Disney prince. When the young Tudor was seventeen years old, Saint Thomas More spoke highly of him as he ascended the English throne in 1509 (Graves, 2003, p.1). In his youth, Henry was already well versed in many languages, including French and Latin, and educated in mathematics, medicine, theology and other scholastic domains. His figure was also impressive with a frame of six feet, two inches and an avid sportsman (Graves, 2003, p. 9). The king also had a habit of recklessness, hosting jousting tournaments and getting injured consequently. The injuries may have contributed to the change in Henry’s personality that later led to the well-known tyrant today; the English …show more content…
The Tudor was healthy in his youth and competed in competitions like jousting and hunting. Jousting involves an armored man with a long wooden lance charging his opponent with the intent to knock him of his horse or break his own lance by contact. Henry was known for hosting and competing in grandeur tournaments that led to many of his minor injuries (McCarthy, 2009). His first significant accident happened in 1524 when he forgot to lower his visor prior to jousting and incidentally was struck above his eye with his opponents lance that then knocked him unconscious (Chalmers & Chaloner, 2009). There are no records regarding his mental or physical state post accident, but historically following the trauma the King initiated a marriage annulment to Katharine of Aragon in order to marry Anne Boleyn, and instituted himself the head of the Church (Graves, 2003, p. iv). There was no correlation that his head injury contributed to these events, especially since the motive for his divorce was in his desire for to have a son (Historic Royal Palaces, 2015), but neurocognitive damage was likely to have occurred. Since multiple head injuries create neurological deficits like memory, attention and concentration (Graham & Rivara, 2014), this injury should be taken into consideration with his second …show more content…
That of which leads to the person displaying at least one of the following: loss of consciousness, posttraumatic amnesia, disorientation and confusion, and neurological sign. In addition, criteria C states that the symptoms must persist immediately following the accident or after consciousness (DSM). Written records did not describe Henry as disorientated, amnestic or displaying neurological signs like disruption in visual field. However, because he was unconscious for two hours due to rapid movement of the head and impact with the ground he fulfills the first portion of criteria. Criteria A requires fulfillment of the criteria for Mild Neurocognitive Disorder which is met with marked decline in cognition via “complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, perceptual-motor, or social cognition”. The second criteria is that the cognitive decline does not impair daily functioning (as opposed to Major Neurocognitive Disorder), the third criteria being independent of delirium, and lastly that no other disorder best describes the

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