Helen Keller Meaning Of Understanding

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Often we ask one another, “What do you mean?” in an effort to understand something more clearly, whether it be a comment, joke, language, even a word, or in many cases objects, encounters, experiences, and sometimes other people, that are difficult to understand. All together creating meaning helps with understanding and making meaning of one another. On the other hand, language also has meaning; It has meaning that is attached to by the application of a certain group or culture. Most importantly, there is the meaning as the individual and what he/she has meaning for. Individuals have meaning for things and their personal importance; however, I also think that there are many meanings that are attached to the individual as there are different …show more content…
An example is the case of Helen Keller who was blind and deaf, but who excelled in any of the obstacles that required the senses, like recognizing. She was able to strive forward and survive through the teaching of symbols and meaning through the sense of touch, and it was her control of this center point that guides the sense that she managed to give meaning to her life. Such adaptation of our senses is intrinsic to our perceiving and distributing meaning. Through the ability to reason and the capability to reach the imagination, Helen Keller was able to retrieve meaning from things that ultimately gave her meaning. The example goes to prove that “even the world of deaf, dumb, and blind [a] child can become incomparably broader and richer than the world of the most highly developed animal” which is to say that, although she could neither hear nor see, her ability to feel was extraordinary, which allowed her, in an ironic way, to see and hear through touching (Cassier). Meaning, although her acquiring of information was different, it was similar to the rest in the way that she knew what, for example, water was just as the school child who was not blind nor deaf knew, but it was the experience that was different; the conditioning was carried out differently from one to the other. …show more content…
From the actuality and the possibility a symbol is made. However, in the Cassier hand out Kant expresses that “[. . .] the difference between actuality and possibility also becomes uncertain” it is through this uncertainty that imagination surfaces and through this congregation a symbol arises, which in turn through the subconscious, maybe, meaning is created (Cassier). It is through the imagination that, I think Helen Keller was able to survive throughout her life. Our culture and peers give us their meaning for us to use to give meaning to our external world. In other words what is meaningful to us is out of the creation from the imagination of others that have been conditioned. Therefore, I would state that the mind and the subconscious are very important for creating meaning for the external and internal world, but it is only through experience that not only do we analyze the meaning that is given but allows for one to create their own meaning. In the class handout on Romanticism it states that Blake and Coleridge who were also “idealist” because for them the mind is the jewel of importance; however, they also believed that the governing work of the mind is imagination (Romanticism, 293). In this sense imagination is vital for creating meaning for oneself and of that of what is “out there.” However, I do disagree with the standpoint of “Each

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