What Is Heidegger's Criticism Of Technology

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“...In it’s very Being, that Being is an issue for it” Phenomenology, according to Boeree, “is an effort at improving our understanding of ourselves and our world by means of careful description of experience” (Boeree, 2000). In several of Heidegger’s works, specifically Being in Time and The Question Concerning Technology, he explores the idea of what it means “to be”, giving priority to human experience (as we serve as the only entity that has prior knowledge of “Being”). However, with advancements in technology and science incentivizing us to live inauthentically, the world we’ve come to know has exchanged truth for efficiency.
However, before beginning to explain what Heidegger means whenever he’s referring to the concept of dasein, we
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Essence of Technology, The Enframing, and its Danger!
In regards to the essence of technology, it’s important to note that the essence of technology is far removed from anything related to technology. Instead, technology is best understood, according to Heidegger, not as a means to an end, but as a “bringing-forth” of true or a method of revealing. The method of revealing called upon by modern technology is known as enframing, being fueled by human desires for precise and scientific knowledge of the world.
Heidegger’s criticism of technology doesn’t focus on technology itself, but rather the mindset that modern technology has plagued being with. As a result of modern technology “framing” our existence to precise calculations and variables. He describes the enframing through stating that “frame can only reveal by reduction” and it “attempts to enclose all beings within particular claims” (Heidegger, 309). Heidegger warns us that if this process continues, the world will be converted into something known as the “standing reserve”. The “standing reserve” is a concept associated with the raw materials available in the world. If humanity is to continue along with the enframing process we have set forth for ourselves, then the world will be reduced to nothing but resource, eventually risking our own being, as humans are also fair game in terms of being classified as raw material for the standing reserve. What’s also at risk here is the development of a specific egoism that would cause humanity, to essentially, be blind to the true ways in which the world reveals itself because of the security we feel within our ontic perceptions of the world. In other words, as science and information evolve to become more “precise”, at the same time truth is revealed, it will be covered up as

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