Co-Presence In Cantor's Transfinite Summary

Superior Essays
As Russell reconstructs the idea of co-presence in the light of physics, mathematics, and cosmology, he appeals to the examples of non-Hausdorff manifolds and Cantor’s threefold concept of the finite, the transfinite, and the infinite in mathematics and to the non-locality of quantum mechanics. Thereby, he renders co-presence as an infinite fractal-like character. To be more specific, gleaning from Pannenberg the idea of the dialectical mutual indwelling of the finite and the infinite, based on Hegel’s concept of infinity, Russell specifies the notion of infinite as the consummation of the finite that is yet larger than their sum. In so doing, he employs Georg Cantor’s notion of the transfinite. As Pannenberg sees God as ontologically …show more content…
Hausdorff manifold space is analogically applicable to the temporality of the present creation where certain enduring periods of time are separated in the succession of moments with the loss of the past and the unavailability of the future. However, with non-Hausdorff manifold, one can conceptualize the co-presence of different enduring fragments of time, while their distinction is preserved. In other words, there can be “temporal distinctions without …show more content…
Here the mutual dialogue is possible by virtue of the philosophical notion of contingency that bridges theology and natural science. The contingency of the universe is not merely a temporal finitude of the universe, but also includes the ontological contingency of its existence while historical contingency is not downplayed. Thus, God’s creation is not only in an unmediated form but also can be seen as a “mediated and direct mode” as one can interpret the transition from the Hawking domain into the Einstein domain as God’s creative presence ex nihilo. Likewise, in creatio ex vetere, the eschatological transformation of the universe, God’s redemptive presence is not only in an unmediated mode but also in a mediated and direct mode of divine action. For this reason, the notion of precondition of ex vetere in the present creation becomes important for Russell. The preconditions imply the transformability of the universe in ontological openness to the radically transformative divine action. This is not the violation of the natural order, but rather the fulfillment of the ongoing creation of the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Force Field Theory Summary

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages

    4. Analysis of Keller’s Assimilationist View of the Relationship between Theology and Natural Science Based on aforementioned discussions, I notice that Keller acknowledges that there is not only consistency but also autonomy to a certain degree between theology and science. To be specific, for Keller, while claiming for “the reconciliation of religion and science” , she sees that theology has its own right in presenting the seemingly impersonal infinity of the cosmos as the creation of the interpersonal God of infinite love. In this way, theology can complement natural science in its own right. Also, Keller engages with diverse Judeo-Christian materials ranging from Scriptural traditions to medieval Jewish mysticism, such as…

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    In the fine-tuned universe, God remains “objectively” (both in general and special providence) present in creatio continua in both usual and unusual occurrences in the course of evolution of living creatures in particular and in the history of the evolving universe in general. God can be seen as creative in the history of the universe through a direct/indirect yet “mediated” mode or through “created natural gaps in the causal regularities of nature.” They are “simply part of the way nature is constituted by God’s creative action ex…

    • 1372 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    How could divine God become human without changing his substance? To preserve divine immutability in the incarnation, the doctrine of God has been developed based on a priori probability. As a result,…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Scientism helps support atheism in the sense that with what I said earlier, science deals with analytical and synthetic statements. Truth is equated with a positivist understanding. Religious references to God can neither be considered true or false, since…

    • 1321 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Why Do Proof God Exist

    • 1911 Words
    • 8 Pages

    If God exists, then the spiritual realm exists, it is mentally logical, and poses no intellectual contradictions. For those who witness what has been seen, God is all-powerful and can and does have a place in the universe—which He created. Another explanation made by Evans and Manis (2009) is that God does exist based on the “contingency of the universe” (p. 69). In other words, the existence of the substances or their effects around the universe are based on the odds or likelihood of truly remaining--an absolute. In contrast, McCloskey (n.d.) claims that the cosmological argument is centered on the “first cause” and the effect of the cause of existence of an all-powerful being (p.63).…

    • 1911 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Essay On Dualism

    • 1085 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Despite of this, the God of Christianity is sound to believe to exist through philosophical reasoning based on the functioning and existence of morality, a belief in metaphysical world and dualism. Through belief in a metaphysical…

    • 1085 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Aquinas's Causal Argument

    • 1073 Words
    • 5 Pages

    We all have innate ideas of what infinity is. While it seems as though Descartes thought of his idea of God through the senses, Descartes used God as a representation to show what infinity represents. I like how Descartes mentioned that there must be a sufficient cause. This sufficient cause for a concept to exist because a concept cannot appear out of nowhere even though I have innate ideas. My innate ideas originate by interacting with the world around me and understanding patterns such as shapes and numbers that exist beyond the physical world.…

    • 1073 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If we question if our clear and distinct perceptions are reliable, and answer that with the fact that God exists, we also can question how we know God exists—our answer being that our clear and distinct perceptions prove it. In order to successfully reach a valid argument, it needs to be based off of fact rather than assumption. The way that Descartes goes about his reasoning is through deduction, yet his deduction goes on into an infinite circle of assumption. Descartes premises leading to him to his conclusion regarding his essence being a thinking thing is continuously reinforced by the existence of God. However, this existence of God is assumed and reciprocates with his acknowledgement of clear and distinct…

    • 780 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    These cosmological arguments were designed to examine the beginning of the universe and God’s possible role in creating it. Although flaws can be found within each of them, they are all important to…

    • 977 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Lay out the Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God in terms of the notion of explanation. • Everything can be explained by something else, or it explains itself. • God is self-explained because his nature explains his existence, and since God is self-explained, he can also be used to explain the existence of how everything else came to be, or at least how it all began. 7. Lay out Clarke’s version of the Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God in terms of the notion of contingency.…

    • 946 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays