Health Care Vs Universal Healthcare

1229 Words 5 Pages
How many times have you heard, America has the best health care system in the world? This is not a reality; we may be paying the most on the planet for health care but there is no objective evidence to support the claim that our health care system is the best. Actually, many wonder whether we'd be better off adopting a universal health care system. The Unites States is the only industrialize nation that does not provide universal health care for its citizens. In many views, the health care system costs too much, covers less and dismisses too many. Why is it that many of us seem to inherit a unique ideology, that health care must be “earned,” no matter how much or how little control a person has over their health status? There is a stigma …show more content…
By implementing a universal healthcare system, the government will have complete control over the healthcare system. By entrusting our federal government, healthcare would no longer be on a profit-based system but instead, on an availability-oriented program. Americans will no longer need to worry about the financial burden of paying or being denied. Physicians will have the ability to develop comprehensive treatment plans. Medical decisions by qualified physicians or specialists not by individuals who have had no medical training. “It has been estimated that the cost of administration of Medicare is 4 percent to 5 percent of its budget, while the typical private company's budget for administration and profit is about 25 percent” (Medicare advantage, 2016). Satisfaction with U.S healthcare is the lowest of any industrialized nation. By identifying the flaws of the current system it will become evident that universal healthcare is the only practical means of improving the healthcare system so that everyone, regardless of their income, ethnicity, or medical needs will be guaranteed healthcare by the same entity that provides education, law enforcement, and social …show more content…
For example, under our current privatized system, a person with diabetes is seen as “uninsurable”. This is because a person with diabetes will inevitably need considerable medical attention and so for a company whose main goal is to pay for as little coverage as possible to maximize profitability, it is against their best interest to insure a person with diabetes. But under a socialized system where the government provides coverage, a person with diabetes wouldn’t have to worry about paying a high price for medical costs or being treated unfairly, because the government would not discriminate against those with specific needs since everyone would be universally covered regardless as to their individual needs. Questions may arise, would a person be responsible for their own medical needs? For example, an obese person who makes no effort to change their diet or exercise yet needs medical coverage for their failing health, or a person who smokes their whole life and inevitably needs medical attention. In this case it may seem unfair to ask everyone to spend their tax dollars for certain people who brought their problems onto themselves. But once again we must remember that healthcare is a human

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