Hatshepsut: The Temple Of Deir El-Bahri

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Hatshepsut became Queen of Egypt when she married her half-brother, Thutmose II, around the age of 12. Thutmose II was the son of her father, King Thutmose I and one of his second wives. When her husband died, she began acting as regent for her stepson, Thutmose III, becoming co-ruler of Egypt with him in 1473 B.C. She then sent Thutmose III to the military so she could be the sole ruler of Egypt. She then transitioned into being Pharaoh by using many different strategies. As Pharaoh, Hatshepsut extended Egyptian trade and built the Temple of Deir el-Bahri, located in western Thebes, where she would be buried. Depicted as a male in many images and sculptures, at her own orders, Hatshepsut remained unknown to scholars until the 19th century. …show more content…
One of the highlights in her reign was her creation of the Temple of Deir el-Bahri. This temple still stands today, strong and rigid. It is situated on the west bank of the Nile River and guards the entrance to the Valley of the Kings. The walls of the temple are also engraved with Hatshepsut's autobiography. Many of these engravings were chiseled off by her stepson Thutmose III. Archeologists don’t know exactly why he did this, but they speculate that he did this so that his son would be the only choice for the title of Pharaoh. In the 21st dynasty, priests gathered the remaining bodies that were found in tombs outside of the Valley of the Kings and placed them in the Deir el-Bahri. This was to stop people plundering the …show more content…
In recent years, scientists have speculated the cause of her death is the use of an ointment or salve to alleviate a chronic skin condition. Scientists have tested artifacts found near her tomb and they have been traced back to a carcinogenic substance. Hatshepsut was definitely an unusual woman, let alone an unusual Pharaoh. She still ruled as a great leader of Egypt and she influenced many of her successors with her grand designs builds and trading

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