Harlem Renaissance Impact

Good Essays
The Harlem Renaissance influenced people artistically, musically and through literature, by spreading through the states. The Harlem Renaissance started nineteen twenty and ended in nineteen thirty.

(How it started and its impacts)
The Harlem Renaissance was the birth of literature, theatre, and music. African Americans had moved to Harlem because of the white supremacy that was rising in the south. The threat that their lives were on the lines had them embark on the Great Migration. Most African Americans relocated themselves to the Urban North, searching for better lives and work. Because of this population rose in Harlem. Harlem's black population rose over a hundred sixty one thousand within eleven years. (West 4)
Northerners
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The Harlem Renaissance took most of its inspiration from the Caribbean and U.S (Hutchinson 4). Even though Harlem was a white district, by the early nineteen twenties it was black-owned. Black intellectuals from Washington, Baltimore, and Los Angeles met in Harlem or the Borough of Manhattan. Even though they had their own theaters and reading groups, New York City was very diverse and decentered black social world where no one could question it. People also brought forth the musical aspect of the Renaissance, the birth of “Shuffle Along” introduced white New Yorkers to Black music, entertainment, and theatre (Wintz 7). It also helped to rejuvenate and redefine music and nighttime life in Harlem. “Shuffle along” bought jazz to Broadway, it ran over four hundred seventy-four performances on Broadway and created three touring companies.
The Visual arts phase of the Harlem Renaissance released later from its musical part. A noticeable artist during this period was Aaron Douglas, who arrived in Harlem from Kansas City. He created few pieces and became recognized by W.E.B Du Bois, Du Bois placed one of Douglas’s works in his book The Crisis. Du Bois connections with Langston Hughes and Wallace Thurman allowed Douglas to illustrate pieces for the book Fire!!( Wintz 14). Because of this recognition, Douglas became a high-profile artist during the Harlem
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It was a time to be remembered, but it had its downs. The nineteen thirty-five Harlem race riot had damaged the image of Harlem. In March, a Puerto Rican boy became accused of stealing a ten-cent pocket knife from a five-and-dime store (Hutchinson 31). After the arrest of the young boy, rumors had spread themselves that police beat the boy to death. Crowds gathered shouting “Police brutality” and “Racial discrimination”. The riot looted, smashed and caused general disharmony. Resulting in three blacks dead and two hundred stores burnt and trashed. They caused about two million dollars in damage before news spread that the boy was alive and released. But that one incident had put a crack in the perfect image of Harlem as an urban utopia. Even with the influence of artists, writers, music, and entertainment. Harlem was a slum, shaped by poverty and

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