Hamilton's Legacy The Seed In A Garden Analysis

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Legacy: The Seed in a Garden “There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism.” (Hamilton). Known as a bastard orphan, Hamilton was born and raised on an island named Nevis in the British West Indies on January 11, 1757. With a mother who died, father who vanished, and a cousin who had committed suicide, Hamilton was left alone. At the age of 14, he started working for a trading charter which imported and exported goods to and from America. Hamilton dreamed of something bigger, so in 1772, Hamilton sailed off to America to begin an education at King's College. As Hamilton found his way into America, he was eager to earn fame and success for himself (Chernow 7-15). He wanted …show more content…
Hamilton spent a majority of his life in America creating these political ideas which shaped him into more of a political theorist. He questioned government regulations and the way the government should function. One of his roles in politics included the constitutional convention which took place in Philadelphia in 1787. During one of the convention meetings, the delegates of America were discussing the ratification of the new United States Constitution. There were two warring sides of this debate: The Federalists and The Anti-Federalists. The Federalist party believed in the constitution and they did not think that The Bill of Rights were necessary; it was led by Hamilton. “Both Hamilton and Madison argued that the Constitution didn't need a Bill of Rights, that it would create a "parchment barrier" that limited the rights of the people, as opposed to protecting them.” (The Great Debate 1). In order to support and defend The Constitution, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay had come up with a plan to write a total of 25 essays divided evenly among the three men, this later became 85 essays. …show more content…
In 1776, he became captain of the company of artillery. General George Washington knew Hamilton’s abilities with pen and paper, so he had assigned Hamilton as his aide-de-camp. In this time, Hamilton had no role in military combat. “He [Hamilton] drafted many of Washington's letters to high-ranking Army officers, the Continental Congress, and the states. He also was sent on important military missions and drafted major reports on the reorganization and reform of the Army.” (American Revolution). These reports would be sent out to people including General Washington. The reports would let everyone know the status of the war which was an advantage for the Americans. As a few years passed, Hamilton resigned his position as aide-de-camp and captain of the company of artillery. “In July 1781 Hamilton's persistent search for active military service was rewarded when Washington gave him command of a battalion of light infantry in the Marquis de Lafayette's corps.”(American Revolution). The Battle of Yorktown was a turning point in the war for Americans. Britain had surrendered and the US finally started to gain their freedom from

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