Spread Of HIV/AIDS

Improved Essays
Question 11

HIV/AIDS is a very serious, life-threatening, and almost entirely preventable disease. With increased education and awareness, we can continue to decrease the number of new cases each year, encourage all to become knowledgeable about the disease and get tested, and bring attention and care to current HIV/AIDS patients. One of the most at-risk groups to become infected with HIV/AIDS is young adults, who made up 39 percent of all new infections and 15 percent of all people living with AIDS as of 2012. If offered the opportunity to present about HIV/AIDS to a health education class at my previous high school, I would volunteer, not only to share my knowledge, but also to encourage and spread awareness and education.
In order to most
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With greater understanding of the disease, we are able to educate all people about HIV/AIDS, its risk factors, and how to protect themselves against infection. Currently, there are over one million people living with HIV in the United States and one in eight HIV positive individuals does not know they are infected. Education is essential to prevent unintentional spread of HIV. First and foremost, I would dismiss any common misconceptions about HIV/AIDS, including the fact that there is no safe way to have unprotected sex without being vulnerable to the HIV virus; it can be transmitted through anal, vaginal, and oral sex. Use of a condom during intercourse is the most important and effective HIV prevention method. Though condom use is not an absolute guarantee of HIV transmission prevention, transmission risk is drastically reduced with proper use. Condoms are a much safer, healthier, and cheaper alternative to suffering from the financial, physical, and emotional burdens of a life-long debilitating illness. Additionally, HIV is present in all geographic locations, and simply because the students I would be presenting to live in Wyoming does not lessen their vulnerability to infection. Next, I would encourage all students to get tested, become informed bout their own personal health, and then if necessary, take steps to manage the situation. If possible, I would invite a local specialist to …show more content…
They will be able to share their newfound knowledge of the disease and its effects with others, will engage in less risk behaviors, and will be aware of their own HIV status. With that result, the students may seek medical care if need be and begin a road to treatment. A greater knowledge and awareness of the HIV in young adults could lead to a decrease in new cases and a reduction in risk behaviors that may predicate HIV

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