Guy De Maupassant The Necklace Analysis

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The Necklace by Guy De Maupassant Guy De Maupassant’s The Necklace is a story about a woman whose life is not what she feels she deserves. Mathilde live is an illusory world where objects, appearance, associations have life-changing powers. And due to Mathilde having these materialistic beliefs she changes her life drastically in one night. She does this by borrowing an expensive diamond necklace from her friend and wearing it to a ball. Mathilde enjoys the rapture and joy of the night floating on the success of her debut. But at last, she brought back to reality when she realizes she has lost her friend’s necklace. From that moment on Mathilde’s life is change immensely and what once was peaceful is turn into chaos. Both she and her husband are in distress and struggle to …show more content…
Due to this simple mistake, Mathilde suffers greatly in a multitude of ways. One of the first ways that Mathilde suffers is that of morally. She suffers this way because she allowed her greed, envy, and need for richer and more expensive things to make her scheme and lied to her husband for a new dress. Mathilde also pretends to be a person she is not just to make others envy her. Mathilde’s greed is shown early in the story by the author when it is stated that” She had no gowns, no jewels, nothing. And she loved nothing but, she felt made for that. She would have liked so much to please, to be envied, to be charming, to be sought after” (Maupassant 163). She also looks down upon the peasant servant who takes care of her house and wishes instead that she had servants that were elite and invisible. Mathilde is ungrateful and acts like a spoiled child. Especially when her husband comes home with the invitation to the ball. Mathilde throws a tantrum and cries when her husband suggests that she wear her theater gown. She does not care to know what her husband had to give

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