Guns Germs And Steel Analysis

2043 Words 9 Pages
My take on the differences that exist between developed and developing nations fundamentally remains the same as it had before the viewing of this series. Ultimately, these beliefs remain consistent and this series delivers a perspective that, though new to me, still serves to reinforce my basic take on this. That is, that disparities in development and stability of nations, is not contingent on any differences in intelligence among the respective populace of nations, but rather it came down to a chain of events that proved to serve them differently. The outcomes of their success with development are based mostly on differences in circumstance and geography, little of which seemed to be in their foresight or control. In light of this and after …show more content…
Parts 2 and 3 of the mini-series explained how the classic argument of racial and ethnic superiority is absurd and baseless. Within the heat of the history of mankind, as it unfolded, it is easier to understand how the Europeans felt this way. They were not familiar with the cultures, history, or climatic conditions of other indigenous peoples, and upon first contact with these people they didn’t have much versing outside of their own cultural perspectives, which is all they could rely on when they first ventured across the …show more content…
Diamond concluded that the spread was so fluid because lands in the same latitude have similar daylight lengths, similar climatic conditions and rendered transport/communication between these lands considerably more possible. The last part of Part 3 of ‘Guns…’, explains the import of livestock and plant species from the cradle of agriculture to the rest of the continent. The rest of this story grows from this. More food meant more stability, which led to increasing population and forging of advanced societies, thus stimulating the creation of developed

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