Gulliver's Travels Literary Criticism

Improved Essays
It is an obvious and well known fact that Swift used much satire in Gulliver’s Travels. He is criticizing and attacking humanity through this technique (Orwell). While Swift criticized the people of England in his piece, he most certainly got criticized for Gulliver’s Travels because many critics had much to say. Literary criticism can help a reader decide if a book is worth the read or not. For the most part, while that is just one person’s opinion, it can make quite an impact on a societal, or overall view of the book if other literary critics have opinions on the book that parallel. I believe Gulliver’s Travels is still a relevant book for the themes that are used in it. It is a classic that should be used in English classrooms across the …show more content…
It definitely had repercussions for Swift as to how people responded to his book. According to Donoghue, in a way, Swift brainwashed Lemuel Gulliver the character itself. Typically authors give the main character some sort of background or story, give them character and personalities as to how they will handle situations that occur (Donoghue). Although, Swift didn’t do this at all. There is nothing there in Gulliver. He gave Gulliver no depth, no character or personality (Donoghue). He turned out to be basically “a man without qualities” (Donoghue). In return, Swift became known to many in the long run, but not what he hoped for. Swift has a book that gives people a memory of nothing (Donoghue). While Swift is criticized for having no depth and seemingly put no effort into creating a story for Gulliver, he is also criticized for being not thorough in his writing itself. Whether it was sentence structure, or the message he was trying to convey with his words, it didn’t always come off properly (Orwell). There was at times when he tried to use his satire he is so famously known for with this book that it came off forced, therefore ineffective (Orwell). In addition to these critiques, Considine shed light on other topics Swift was to be criticized for. Many easily understood what Swift was underlying writing about after it was read; the people of England, English society, politics, and government. While much satire was used in the book to describe England in a negative light, it only got a “cheap laugh” (Considine). Gulliver’s Travels appears to be a book that has examples of public choice themes, and it does (Considine). Although, it was received in the best way

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    This evidence was not only irrelevant to his claim but it was also unpersuasive toward his audience. This evidence lacked the use of ethos and pathos. Another claim that was made in the text was an audience even clarifies the writer’s mind more than writing does. To support this claim, he provides his audience with an hypothetical evidence using pathos. Thompson relies too much on this theories like the “hand waving” theory but never backs up those theories with any type of reasoning nor analysis about them.…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, puzzles many readers due to its strange note at the very beginning implying that there is no motive, moral, or plot to be found. Though, assuming there are, readers infer from the reoccurring theme of slavery that the story tests the main character’s morals. There could be motive in regards to Twain’s wish to show others how good a black man could be. Whatever the motive, readers today struggle to understand Twain’s main purpose because of the complex writing style and boring content. Mark Twain’s writing style often muddles the reader.…

    • 439 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I felt that way they tell every characters journey feels like a bland description of the trip with no dialogue. I find dialogue to be very important thing if you want to keep my attention, and books that lack it are not very interesting. Another thing I did not enjoy was the beginning of the book with the characters descriptions. The descriptions felt more of a bother than actual intrigue, I found myself accidentally zoning off after a few words. The sense of ennui I…

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Carr’s lack of numerical evidence ultimately weakens his entire argument, especially since his audience is targeted towards educated individuals, who normally look for data and statistics to back up claims. Although, Carr included many examples to support his main ideas, the examples did not compensate for the lack of data, statistics, or any other relevant numerical values. Clive Thompson also failed to incorporate the use of logos in his argumentative essay. Similarly to Carr, Thompson used examples in his essay, however he failed to include any form of data or numbers. Without the use of logos, authors, Nicholas Carr and Clive Thompson both dramatically decreased the persuasiveness of their…

    • 1148 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Martin Luther King’s letter from Birmingham jail he wrote a response to someone who believed what he was doing was wrong. The point of his letter was to change the mind of the people reading his letter. He wanted to prove to the readers of his letter that there was a difference between morally right and legally right. In his letter he compared the police in in Birmingham to Nazi Germany, what they were doing was not legally wrong but it was morally wrong. By using mostly pathos in the letter he appealed to the emotions of the reader to support his premises and claims instead of using all the rhetorical devices.…

    • 1605 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury presented Montag as a very nonchalant character that wasn’t worried about anything but his job. He started out talking to Clarisse and discouraging her passion for learning about the past and books, but then his own curiosity got the best of him while doing his job. He wanted to believe that the government was right, but human nature made him start on his journey to finding out what books were about. Eventually, when he was caught and almost arrested, he killed Beatty in self defense. While reading the story it seems like a totally unreasonable thing to do, but at that given moment he was under a lot of pressure.…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, just because his underlying message is meaningful, it doesn 't mean that it is conveyed effectively because many completely overlook it and feel as if the message is too buried underneath all of the racist remarks, irony, and satire. The message is there, but it is not very clear. Especially, to people of a young age who may have trouble understanding the heavy satire. When this book is read on a literal level, the message is totally different, which causes much confusion in the…

    • 1112 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is an essay especially created to illustrate the, quite few, but evident, the flaws of the English language. Though easy to learn, versatile and beautiful, the political evolution and the political power shift, have created a certain stereotype, and people tend to write, some sort of, robotic sentences, using a lot of words to express a short, simple message. Humanity didn’t do this on its own, politics and snobbery played crucial roles in this development. Instead of using simplicity, we now try to overcomplicate things, making some texts harder to read, a bit boring and simply robust. Are the reasons purely of economical nature?…

    • 1042 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    How can a man judge what is true if he is not true to what he says? For example, earlier in the novel, Marlow reduces the importance of his journey when he sarcastically responds to his aunt. He is not honest to the readers (although notably sarcastic) from the beginning; therefore, it does not find him well to describe anything as…

    • 720 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He also highlights the negative actions that humans are capable of including lying and abuse. Twain uses Huckleberry 's encounters with many different people along his journey to show these points. Uses of satire within the novel to make fun of useless feuds, the importance…

    • 1027 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays