Gender Roles In American Film

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screenwriting, and social nuance. 1967 was the year that also saw Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (Kramer, 1967), In The Heat of The Night (Jewison, 1967), and Hurry Sundown (Preminger, 1967) cement the careers of Sidney Poitier and Diahann Carroll. Poitier and Carroll were among a handful of actors to appear in major Hollywood productions that addressed themselves to the blackness of the actors, while suggesting accommodation of their civil rights environs.
With the contemplation of mixed marriage in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, and the stand for equal rights in the guise of a post-Civil war, post-World War II fight for land ownership in Hurry Sundown, (Courtney, 2005) both these films carry broad intimations of second-wave feminism, which focused on bodily freedoms and economic empowerment. Cast in
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H2: Presentations of black sex and gender will continue to function as generative film narrative mechanisms through both actualization and appropriation by other races.
As a function of reviewing the American film genres discussed above, this study believes that presentations of black sex and gender roles in American cinema will respond to the following research questions:
RQ1: Technology both changed and grew within the fifty-year period encompassed by this study. What are the effect of technological advances on presentations of black sex and gender roles in American cinema?
RQ2: According to author Susan Jeffords, the Reagan administration was highly influential in many of the changes, advances, and mechanisms surrounding 1980s American film, even going so far as to inform narratives and define a specific kind of hero. Is this effect cyclical, and how will it effect presentations of black sex and gender roles in American cinema, going

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