Managerial Approach To Public Administration

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Public Service is the selfless act of an individual to commit their efforts to serving their communities in such a way that will make their communities better off regardless of the conditions prior to their contributions. Given the hullaballoo surrounding our current political landscape after this past presidential election, there is an increasing urgency for public servants to do their jobs with integrity. Several hate crimes have been motivated by the rhetoric that has been permeated through the media during the campaigning season leading up into the fateful election. Furthermore, it is comprehensible to theorize that the duties of public servants may become more stringent as hate speech has seemingly become tolerable and heinous acts have inadvertently become customary routine as our political leaders have set the precedence for what is considered satisfactory behavior of elected officials. Nevertheless, it is our obligation as public administrators to deliver public services …show more content…
Theoretically, the managerial approach to public administration contends that public administration is a “field of business” as quoted by Woodrow Wilson (Rosembloom,1983). Under this theoretical premonition of public administration, it depersonalizes citizens and concentrates on the economic profits of subordinates. The managerial approach to public administration, government is focused on setting policy that will aid in maximizing efficiency of operations rather than interpersonal relations among colleagues. Subsequently, it is focused on providing the greatest good for the greatest number. That frame of mind is riddled with externalities as there are several instances in American history that contends the needs of everyone must be considered. The political approach to public administration is the more subordinate friendly vision for public

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