What Is Obama's Imperial Power?

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When the founding fathers created the Presidency it was never their intention to enable a unitary executive who had power over foreign and domestic policy. That is why there exists a separation of power, checks and balances, and the power to impeach; because the founding fathers foresaw the risks of allowing one person to have too much power and become imperial. Yet presidents since Franklin Roosevelt have wielded greater power than ever before due to the expansion of their staff, the public’s expectations of the president, a weakened congress, and technological changes. Our last two presidents, George Bush and Barack Obama, have faced widespread criticism for their “imperial” actions which can put them over the law and allow them pseudo legislative …show more content…
Through his use of signing statements and executive orders Obama has exceeded his role as president domestically and through his use of drone strikes and policy in Libya Obama has ignored the War Powers act and acted outside of his constitutional presidential powers. Obama has tried to protect his prerogative through using signing statements to put United States troops under a United Nations command and to refute congressional limits on Guantanamo Bay. An example of the expansion of Obama’s power is in his refusal to defend the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). The Obama announced that he would not defend any case involving DOMA, this action directly conflicts with the purpose of the president and the executive branch which is to execute the laws of the United States. In this case, Obama is acting outside of his powers in deeming the law unjust and refusing to enforce it. Obama has used 226 executive orders to bypass congress and complete his political agenda. His executive orders range in domestic and foreign policy, such as DACA the deferred action for child immigrants. While Obama’s use of executive orders falls in line with the precedent set by previous presidents, it should not serve as a default method to create policy. More and more Obama has faced an uphill …show more content…
Starting with emergencies like the Great Depression and WWII, the executive branch has expanded in power and responsibility. Due to crises like 9/11, presidents were able to expand their power further. Due to congressional decentralization and a weakening of congressional power congress has provided less oversight on the president. Americans believe in a strong executive but that does not allow for an imperial president. The presidency has amassed an alarming amount of power outside of the constitutional restrictions placed upon it, the remaining question being when will the growth

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