Growth Changes In Alice In Wonderland

Improved Essays
In Lewis Carroll’s book, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Alice undergoes a lot of changes that would normally happen if one were growing up . Alice is then trying to figure out how to stay to her normal size through of the book. She has to learn how to act like an adult throughout the book . Alice is troubled with these issues of suddenly acting like an adult and growing up .

The Rapid Change of Growth
Alice encounters many growth changes through the book. The first change she goes through is in the first chapter when she sees the bottle that has a label that says drink me on it . Alice checks the bottle before drinking it to make sure it’s not marked as poison (Carroll l865 pg 9). She eats and drinks things to try to control her height,
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She encounters the problem of not knowing how to solve it. Alice goes through the book not really knowing who she is . She has gone through “changes” that she doesn’t know who she is. Alice really questions the idea of changing and she says, “But if I’m not the same, the next question is ‘Who in the world am I?” (Carroll 1865 pg 10). Alice not only doesn’t know who she is but she does know a basic of who she is, “I–I’m a little girl,’ said Alice, rather doubtfully, as she remembered the number of changes she had gone through that day” (Carroll 1865 pg 40). Alice then has idea of who she …show more content…
Carroll shows how growing up can be enviable and sometimes challenging. Alice is invited to play croquet with the queen but instead of realistic things they use flamingos for the hitting pole. Alice then learns that the queen and the others don’t play by the rules and that she had to adjust. She therefore learns that the queens ideals is that every is her’s. She says , ““The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours."(Lewis 1865 p. 67). Alice has to learn that she has to mature in order to get through life and problems that seem impossible.
Puberty
Alice not only learns to be mature but also she learns that puberty will happen. Alice undergoes many changes from height to not knowing who she is . Alice learns that her body will change through the years as she grows older. She learns that she can’t change or do anything about her height or how her body changes. Also, she learns that her body parts will also change thought out the years. Alice has learned that she has changed because Lewis writes, ““but it's no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.”(Carroll 1865 p. 77)

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