Greek Democracy Vs Modern Democracy Essay

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The three speeches were very centered around democracy. The term “democracy” originates from the Greek people. The growth of democracy in Athens appeared with the fall of the tyrant Pisistratus. After the fall of Athens after the Peloponnesian War, well-designed democracies did not entirely come back until the 19th century. The basic ideologies of democracy were described by Pericles in his funeral oration. According to Lincoln, democracy means “Government of the people, by the people and for the people,” (Nicolay, 209). Whereas, Lysias supports the restoration of democracy because he believes that fighting for equality and rising up in rebellion is worthwhile. It is important to point out that, democratic practices are not the same in Ancient …show more content…
For instance, Athenians considered their power very highly. Pericles stated that Athens was a model for the rest of the world and Athens is the highest in the world since Athens has never given in to hardships, but has endured more sufferings than any other state. The lack of demonstration for a nation as a whole is another similarity between ancient and modern day democracy. Even today there are still examples where the citizens of a nation feel let off from the decision making in the government. Lysias was more troubled with differences between. Modern democracy argues for those imbalances to be wiped out in society. Athenian democracy was select. Women, slaves, as well as children, were not allowed to vote and could not be citizens. According to Thucydides, Pericles changed Athens’s into an empire; Pericles strategies set by the Peloponnesian War. Thucydides backed Pericles, however he did support the idea of democracy because he thought that democracy was controlled. He essentially thought that the democracy under the rule of Pericles would also be controlled however, Thucydides believed that without Pericles there would be total chaos. Regardless of Thucydides' position towards democracy, Pericles’ funeral oration promotes the idea of a democratic form of

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