Greek Influence On The Iliad

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Group 1 Question 1 The poet Homer most known for writing his great epics the “Iliad” and the “Odyssey” had a great impact on Greek attitudes and religion. Homer’s epic the “Iliad” lead to the development of the Greek’s attitude of universal order. Homeric heroes were admired for striving for honor and facing the idea of death with courage. The “Iliad” centers around warrior Achilles protecting his honor and, as a result refusing to fight with King Agamemnon because of his wounded pride. Achilles attempted to make the point the Achaeans needed his military skill. After many of the warriors died including his best friend he reenters battle. Achilles arrogance and need for revenge caused much suffering and death. The “Iliad” portrays the universal …show more content…
Athenian women had low social status compared to Spartan women who were respected in their society, but they did still had similar restriction on their rights. In Athens girls were not expected to learn how to read or write and the only necessary education was training in household skills. While Spartan women were educated in arts, philosophy, music, and were extremely athletic and strong. They still did some house work, but most was accomplished by the helots. Athenian women were also expected to marry around the age of 14 to older men through an arranged marriage. They could get a divorce if they chose to, but the children would remain in the fathers care. Spartan women were married around 18 to men closer in age. Spartan marriage was arranged and they could divorce as well, but they did not have to relinquish their children. In addition, Athenian and Spartan women played different roles in society, but still had similar rights. Athenian women were denied any legal and political rights including financial dealings and owning property. They were barred from public office and could not appear in court without a male representative, or leave them home alone their behavior had to be supervised. Spartan women also could not take an active role in politics and were forbidden to speak in public assemblies. Although, they were allowed to own their own property and did not have to be accompanied by men. There was a strong belief that Spartan women were credited for making men strong. In conclusion, women in Athens had very low social status only small steps above slaves, while Spartan women were seen as strong and had much higher social status and rights. This is historically significant because this was a shift in women’s rights and roles in society. Women went from being viewed as homemakers and insignificant in society, to being seen as strong and intellectual. (331

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