Great To Watch By Maggie Nelson Analysis

Great Essays
The pressure put on an individual to conform to a strict set of norms is unescapable. Modern technology does not help an individual escape from these set of norms. If anything, modern technology helps enforce these norms. Modern technology is used in many various ways and sometimes the way an individual uses it ends up doing more harm than good. Individuals use technology on a daily basis to accomplish various tasks and this has increased our human capabilities. Technology is also constantly bombarding our minds with information on what is happening around the globe and we use these image flow to help create human relationship in some cases. For instance, the way the media portrayed the attack on the twin towers has led some people to really …show more content…
Due to the extremist group’s action, the entire Muslim community was dragged down. In “Great to Watch” by Maggie Nelson, she talks about the connection between mediated images and image flow and how it is connected to human relations. Nelson also discuss how individual’s existence is influenced by these image flows due to how violence and sadism is portrayed. She discusses and provides solutions to the different issues of autonomy and control in her …show more content…
An individual’s existence starts from the moment it was born. As the individual is going through the various stages of life, they create and hold onto memories and lessons they learned. Individuals use these lesson and memories to create personal viewpoints and standards of value. These lessons and memories, in turn, help them learn what brings satisfaction and what disturbs them and makes them cringe internally. In her essay, Nelson claims that individuals have urges to watch different flow if images that would distract them from reality or wanting to take actions. She demonstrates this through Susan Sontag’s theory of individuals existing in an “age of extremity” (Nelson 306). Susan Sontag states we live in “an age of extremity, characterized by the continual threat of two equally fearful, but seemingly opposed destinies unremitting banality and inconceivable terror” (Nelson 306). Science fiction movies are is a great example to help explain her theory. In science-fiction movies, there is always some sort of alien or monstrous and widespread fear of nuclear annihilation or environmental catastrophe. The fears are then soothed by that one brilliant doctor or scientist that figures out how to control the situation and implants a course of action. Similarly Faludi mentions incidents where there was unremitting banality and inconceivable terror in the Citadel. In the Citadel, the upperclassmen would use violence

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