An Analysis Of Charles Dickens 'Great Expectations'

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Great Expectations “Charles Dickens once wrote the following advice for living: ‘Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.’” This quote applies to multiple characters in his book, Great Expectations, which was published in the 1800s. When Dickens gives this piece of advice, he is implying that people should live a life where their heart should never harden, meaning that one shall not feel the need for any detestation or hate to anyone or anything. When he says to have a temper that never tires, he is insinuating that despite all the problems someone may encounter, he or she should not let their temper be uncontrolled and should not feel any sorts of anger but should instead live a life of …show more content…
157). When Mr. Jaggers gives Pip money, Joe is surprised at the fact that Mr. Jaggers is trying to take Pip with him for money, and due to the connection that Pip and Joe have built, Joe values their friendship more than the amount of money that was given to Pip, which is why he says “But if you think as money can make compensation to me for the loss of the little child… the best of friends!”. Later on in the book, when Pip ends up becoming a gentleman, Pip becomes starts to be inconsiderate of how Joe feels because of the difference in their social classes. While Pip is a gentleman, Joe is just a blacksmith and Pip does not want his reputation to be ruined, which is why Pip slowly starts to become distant with Joe. However, even after the way Pip has treated Joe, Joe does not show any signs of hatred towards Pip even though Pip treated him as if he did not matter anymore. Towards the end of the book on Chapter 57, Joe says “Which dear old Pip, old chap, you and me was ever friends. And when you’re well enough to go out for a ride-what larks!” (p. 497) This scene takes place when Pip is sick and finally wakes up. When he wakes up, he comes to find that Joe was the one who was caring for Pip all this time …show more content…
Even though Magwitch stole turnips as a food source because he was a convict, he still tried to return the favor for Pip even though Pip has completed small favor for him long ago. Even though many years has passed by, Magwitch tries his best to fulfill Pip’s hopes of becoming a gentleman. Magwitch reveals to Pip that he is actually his benefactor. Magwitch continues to try and do everything for Pip, and throughout the story he shows that he shows Pip he genuinely cares about him. In Chapter 38, Magwitch refers to himself as Pip’s second father, and says that Pip is his son. “Look’ee here, Pip. I’m your second father. You’re my son-more to me nor any son. I’ve put away money, only for you to spend [....] ‘Here’s that boy again, a-looking at me whiles I eats and drinks!’ [...] ‘but wot, if I gets liberty and money, I’ll make that boy a gentleman!’”. This shows how much Magwitch wants to make Pip a gentleman, and when Magwitch refers to Pip as a second son, it shows how close Magwitch thinks they are. Similarly with Joe and Biddy, Magwitch has done no harm to Pip and has no intentions to get Pip into any trouble and he simply wants to help with what Pip wants to become: a gentleman. Considering Magwitch’s intentions with Pip and after all he has done, I would say that he fits the quote that Dickens

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