Great Backlash Analysis

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The Great Backlash was a surge in conservatism that arrived onto the national stage in response to the liberal environment of the 1960s. The backlash continues today and mobilizes voters with controversial social issues that are attached to pro-business economic policies, i.e. cultural anger is used to achieve economic gains. By focusing on issues like abortion, the Republican party can create financial benefits for the affluent -like tax cuts and union busting- because the single issue voters will accept anything that coincides with their dominant issue. Since there’s a strong rhetoric in the GOP that the elite, wealthy, and well connected are actually making the decisions and working against traditional social beliefs, working class voters …show more content…
Within the modern conservative era, the ideals that sparked the Great Backlash persist and explain how the GOP had significant success in the 2016 elections. The idea of Kansas is synonymous with images of down-home, homegrown, true Americans, and never is it brought up how one of the richest neighborhoods in the country, Mission Hills, exists within the state. However, despite this, Kansas is still able to present itself as an aristocrat of commonness within American politics. Even if a politician is from Mission Hills, they can still peg themselves as an authentic, rugged American. Kansas votes Republican consistently, which is an interesting juxtaposition to a century ago, when it was considered a radical area. After the Summer of Life in 1991, the dynamic became not between Democrats and Republicans, but traditional, moderate Republicans …show more content…
However, the Democratic Party has ceased fighting for blue-collar interests, instead adopting economically conservative policies. The Democratic Leadership Council has coaxed the party to overlook working class voters and focus on white-collar professionals, to gain more campaign contributions than ever received by organized labor. This ostracized the once dependable voting bloc and turned it towards the GOP, which worked to make its ideals appeal to blue-collar voters. The decisions and views of the conservative working class are driven forcefully by the feeling of victimhood and neglect. Anyone with any political strategy -e.g. Republicans- can take this dejectedness and transform it into votes. The election of 2016 shows this almost too perfectly. The working class of America has seen its jobs being shipped overseas, factories close, and the dependability of the blue collar track abandoning them with dismal ghost towns. This feeling flows directly into the idea discussed of “White Rage,” they need a scapegoat for their strifes, so they lash out, and are told by politicians that they are justified. This dejectedness causes them to go through anything just to feel like their voices are being

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