Great Awakening Traditions

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The Great Awakening brought us many rebirths and traditions. Our ancestors provided us many traditions and norms. During this time, America went through a radical transformation. European settlers had moved to the United States and they brought their religious beliefs with them. The Great Awakening goes back to England; many people were starting to go against the Church of England because they believed that the church was starting to grow away from the actual meaning of God. Today I will discuss the impact the Great Awakening had with religion. I shall talk about the people’s beliefs, lifestyle, objections, and their journey. The Great Awakening was indeed a revival. People’s beliefs started to differ from the Church of England. They simply …show more content…
Due to the great religious reform it made Americans want to make their society better, and fight for their rights. Before the Great Awakening, around the late 1700s, a lot of Americans were not really religious. Thanks to the Great Awakening they became more aware of religion and started to care more about God and their faith. “Also new religious groups emerged from the revivals due to disagreements with the already established faiths”. With every pro, there’s a con, some people simply did not agree with the Methodists or Baptists so they started to form new religious groups. Despite having rough ends here and there, the people became more religious and aware of religion …show more content…
“…this new religious movement contained within itself a "powerful egalitarian impulse"”. The Great Awakening provided a revival and freedom to reformed Evangelicals. The revivalist’s messages were stated straightforward. They mainly focused on the outlines of the Christian message. With the second Great Awakening they developed a style that was more emotional and less intellectual. Evangelicals started to distinguish themselves as fundamentalists. “. A "defining characteristic of early evangelicalism," Kidd notes, was its "tendency to take ethnic and racial boundaries lightly" (30). This tendency manifested itself in George Whitefield's ministry to slaves in Georgia”. The Evangelicals came with a dream and they managed to prosper. They believe that people are lost, trapped in sin, without any hope saving themselves, but, they can reach salvation by accepting God’s free offer of salvation through grace and

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