A Good Life In Seneca's On Tranquility Of Mind?

Superior Essays
When one imagens the idea of a “good life” there are many different things might spring to mind. The Romans and Greeks had different ideas of this “good life” and so do I. The way one thinks about this achieved life can illuminate what values they hold. Romans value consistency. Greeks value the middle line, which is sometimes described as average. There are multiple others, but this paper mentions just a few.
As shown in the textbook, tells us in Seneca’s On Tranquility of Mind explains that someone will achieve a “good life” by avoiding burdensome responsibilities, bad friends, and excessive wealth. With those values in mind, one might figure that the Romans tried to run from their problems. They could be described as people who didn’t like
…show more content…
I would compare this statement to Goldie Locks and her search for something just right. This portrays that the Greeks are more average kind of culture. They aren’t people who like their beverage scalding hot or ice cold but rather at room temperature. There is a balance to things in their life and that is what they strive for. Aristotle also believed that happiness depends on how one follows correct virtues. He meant that a virtuous person has a born in disposition to behave the way they’re supposed to, for the right reason, and they have a sense of pride when they act this way. Some might think of this in different ways from the next person; therefore, there are no exact rules set for how to avoid negative behavior. However, only voluntary actions are worthy of praise. This would tell us that not all people can achieve a “good life”. If one does not have that intuition when they are born to do the right thing then they most likely won’t do what is considered right. This would stop them from achieving a “good life”. According to the textbook, the highest good is achieved through contemplation. This thinking cannot be done all day, every day, but it could ultimately allow one to have a wonderful life The Romans and Greeks had their thoughts on a “good life”, however, I don’t completely agree with their way of thinking. In my opinion, experiencing the world and culture is a “good

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    While happiness is a major factor on one’s demeanor, it is not essential to be happy one hundred percent of the time. With happiness comes the contrary emotions: sadness, fear, and anger. Not many people enjoy these emotions because they believe it intervenes with their personal happiness, but these emotions are vital if you are seeking true happiness. When you hear the words sad, fear, and angry, you may think of a difficult time in life, but these feelings are much more than just that. Despite happiness being the goal in everybody's life, showing emotions such as sadness, fear, and anger are important as well because they produce positive outcomes.…

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    I agree with certain components Begley presents, but Begley doesn’t hit on self love and more focuses on relationships with other people rather than oneself. I do agree stronger forms of happiness come from relationships with other people, but I don't think that it brings an individual the highest level of happiness possible. Based on my own experience I wasn’t able to proceed in life, as far as mental health and stability, until I came to terms with myself and decided self love is more important than any judgment another individual could have upon me. Yes, friends and family can bring so much love and care in a person’s life, but ultimately how can you be joyful without the approval of yourself? The impact other people have on someone’s life can be positive, but it can also be negative.…

    • 1773 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Aristotle links the concept of happiness and virtue in saying that the most important factor in the effort to achieve this sense of happiness is to have a good moral character. He goes on to say that one must have this sense of complete virtue, meaning that it is not enough to have a few virtues but instead one must strive to possess them all in order to achieve happiness in the end. He says, “The happy person is the one who expresses complete virtue in his activities, with an adequate supply of external goods, not for just anytime but for a complete life” (Nicomachean Ethics, 10101a15). This quote backs up Aristotle’s argument in that happiness consists of achieving these virtuous actions not just at certain points in one’s life but throughout one’s whole lifetime. Aristotle goes on to say that life requires us to make choices, and some of them bring us immediate pleasure while others require some sort of sacrifice to reach happiness.…

    • 1658 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I do find problems with some parts of the principle, but I think they can be over come. In certain cases I believe people who find some sadness in their life at a point in their life can find ultimate happiness, which is where my conflict with the principle lies. I feel this principle offers a lot of insight on how to view the world within ourselves and deal with the emotions related to our actions, how to understand them wholesomely. Aristotle believes with habit and practice, virtue can manifest itself into ones life and I agree. I know he also believes some people are born with external goods such as beauty and birth predispose one to happiness.…

    • 1032 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As Epictetus once said, “We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have.” The search for what is just or what is right has become so prominent that it overshadows the search for actual happiness. Although some believe that achieving happiness can be a challenge due to obstructions that occur in life, it is possible for everyone to find happiness. However, Plato, in The Republic, and Aristotle, in Ethics, show that happiness can be obtained by finding harmony between justice, friendship, and morality. What is the goal and main purpose of life? Some say to become rich and famous, some say to get an education, and some say to travel the world.…

    • 1943 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    If the ultimate goal is to maximize one’s well-being, then it would seem that acting unjustly would be reasonable. Contrastingly, if an action improves another’s well-being, if it is morally good, then it would be considered just. It is debatable whether or not one can commit an act of justice, and, in doing so, maximize one’s own happiness. Many would claim that just acts are solely for the sake of others and always at the expense of one’s own self-interest. However, I would argue that committing just acts can inadvertently lead to an increase in happiness for some people.…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    By emphasizing the importance of character traits, Aristotle gives humans credit that they can be good people performing activities because of their character not just because of rules they ought to follow. The only weak point in the theory is the reliance on virtue being essential to happiness. It fails to consider that everyone is different, unlike character traits/moral virtues which can vary from person to person or culture to culture. If the ethics of virtue applied all of its components more universally, realizing that everyone is different and that some virtuous people are not happy and some non-virtuous people are, it would make a more sound…

    • 857 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    They both believed that the purpose of human actions was to be happy, which would lead to a good life. For Aristotle, he believed that we strive towards goals in order to find happiness (telos). He also believed that nobody pursues happiness for the sake of something else. Therefore, Aristotle concluded that happiness makes life worthwhile. For Epicurus, he believed that human pleasure was the ultimate happiness.…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Additionally choosing one moral virtue over another shouldn 't necessarily mean that you will be more or less happy with the outcome of the virtue. If moral virtue is arbitrary in the equation, then the question of what is truly entailed in finding out how to be happy is raised. In fact there are particular virtues and traits that are are essential in society today that guarantee a happy life. Self content, conformity, patience, and self insurance are all examples of these traits, that are very important in the attainment of happiness. Without self acceptance and acceptance of reality, it would be hard to be happy in life anyways.…

    • 1492 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Aristotle believes that individuals own happiness is more important than that of the people as a whole. Many of us do not want to accept the fact that humans are selfish creatures, but Aristotle believed that we only did things for ourselves. For example, if we helped someone or did community service, we wouldn’t be doing these things for the people we are helping, but for the feeling of happiness we get after we do the service. Aristotle believes that the feeling of happiness we receive after helping someone is what keeps us coming back, not the fact that we are helping others, but I highly disagree with Aristotle’s point of…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays